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Duquesne dumped by Dayton for its 8th straight loss

| Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, 6:06 p.m.

DAYTON, Ohio — It was a common theme for Duquesne on Saturday: Open shots but a lack of baskets.

“We're down six at half, then we come out and we get four layups to the rim, a wide-open jump shot, and we don't make any of them,” Dukes coach Jim Ferry said after his team lost a first-half lead en route to a 72-56 loss to Dayton, its eighth straight defeat. “Instead of it being a tie game, we're down 12. We're not asking you to make half-court shots backwards. We're asking you to make shots.”

The lack of accurate shooting again stung Duquesne. The Dukes' top two scorers combined for four points, and the team shot 33.3 percent from the field.

Duquesne (7-13, 0-6) remains the only Atlantic 10 team without a win in league play. Two players, freshman Jeremiah Jones (16 points) and sophomore Marvin Binney (13), tallied career-high totals, but leading scorer Sean Johnson and second-leading scorer Derrick Colter had two points apiece.

Duquesne led, 20-13, with 7:45 left in the first half before Dayton rallied for a 30-24 halftime advantage. The Flyers (12-7, 2-3) then scored the first seven points of the second half, and Duquesne was never again within 10 points.

Eight straight points from Binney and a 3-pointer by Quevyn Winters (who finished with 16 points) pulled the Dukes within 53-43 with 7:52 left, but they fizzled as their frustration on the road continued. It also hurt that they played without third-leading scorer Jerry Jones, who sat out for violating team rules.

Senior center Josh Benson led Dayton with 17 points as the Flyers placed five players in double figures and shot 45.3 percent.

Duquesne has a week off before its next game — a road contest against St. Bonaventure on Saturday.

The Dukes haven't won since beating Western Michigan on Dec. 19. They have lost their past eight games by an average of 13 points and have shot 39.8 percent during that stretch — the league's worst shooting team, Rhode Island, entered Saturday shooting 40.4 percent.

“I'm tired of saying we're playing hard enough to win games,” Ferry said. “We have to start making the plays to win the games.”

Kyle Nagel is a freelance writer.

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