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College football notebook: NCAA upholds Boise State sanctions

| Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, 9:18 p.m.

• The NCAA said Wednesday it is standing by a decision that Boise State must lower the number of scholarships it can award this season and next. As part of the penalty package, the NCAA ordered the school to cut scholarships from 85 to 82 this season and in 2013. The school self-imposed the scholarship cut last year as well.

• Ohio State and Texas agreed to a home-and-home series that will have the teams playing in Austin in 2022 and in Columbus in 2023. It's a continued response to major college programs improving their strength of schedule in the new playoff system still being finalized. The games will be played Sept. 17, 2022, at Texas Stadium and Sept. 16, 2023, at Ohio Stadium.

• No. 17 Stanford likely will be without its top wide receiver Saturday when the Cardinal travels to undefeated No. 7 Notre Dame. Stanford coach David Shaw said it was unlikely that sophomore Ty Montgomery will play because of a lower body injury.

• The NCAA declared receiver Jalen Saunders eligible to play for No. 13 Oklahoma this season, just in time for the Sooners' rivalry game Saturday against No. 15 Texas. Saunders, a transfer from Fresno State, caught 50 passes for 1,065 yards last season and led the Western Athletic Conference with 12 touchdown catches.

• SEC commissioner Mike Slive and Big 12 chief Bob Bowlsby met in Nashville, Tenn., to work out the details of their joint bowl game. The front-runners are believed to be the Cotton Bowl held at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, and the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans.

• UCLA receiver Darius Bell (rib) is expected to be out two to four weeks.

— AP

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