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College football notebook: Arkansas coach faces creditors

| Friday, Oct. 12, 2012, 7:13 p.m.

• An attorney for Arkansas coach John L. Smith said Friday that a computer error in his bankruptcy case is behind what appeared to be a huge jump in his debt. Smith's initial Chapter 7 filing in September listed $25.7 million in debt. He later amended that to $40.7 million, blaming land deals gone bad in Kentucky. Attorney Jill Jacoway, speaking during a hearing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, said the computer error resulted in her assistant listing $25.7 million in debt. She said the error resulted in a rough draft being filed. Smith was accompanied by wife Diana and Jacoway during the hearing at which he was asked by trustee John Lee about any possible assets he might have, including any inheritance from his parents and brother Bart, who died Sept. 17. Smith, who said a counter-suit was possible against one of his creditors, was asked by attorneys for his creditors about the listed value of several of the land-development companies in which he was a partner. The former Michigan State and Louisville coach is trying to wipe away his debt and hang on to $1.2 million in retirement accounts and some personal property. The Razorbacks (2-4, 1-2 SEC) host Kentucky (1-5, 0-3) on Saturday.

• ESPN reported that Navy won't join the Big East before 2015, despite reported requests from the conference to make the move earlier. “There's a laundry list of reasons why we can't join in 2013 or 2014, and none of those objectives have changed,” Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk told ESPN.

• No. 2 Oregon suspended senior defensive tackle Isaac Remington indefinitely after he was cited for driving under the influence. Eugene police said Remington was pulled over early Friday. A court hearing is set for Nov. 1. Oregon is off this weekend before facing Arizona State on Thursday.

— Wire reports

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