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College football notebook: Another knee injury for Lattimore

| Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, 5:58 p.m.
South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore is taken off the field after getting injured during the first half against Tennessee on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012, in Columbia, S.C. (AP)

South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore was taken to a hospital and is out indefinitely with an injury to his right knee suffered in Saturday's 38-35 victory against Tennessee.

Lattimore was running through the left side when he was struck around the knees by defensive back Eric Gordon, Lattimore's right leg whipping around and slamming against the turf. South Carolina trainers rushed to his side, keeping Lattimore on his back as the junior attempted to sit up.

“I just tried to tell him to stay mentally strong,” said receiver Ace Sanders, whose eyes teared up when discussing Lattimore. “I saw the look in his eyes when he was on the ground, and he was really heartbroken.”

Lattimore was taken off the field on a cart and went to a hospital for further evaluation. Coach Steve Spurrier didn't give details of the injury, only that it was every bit as devastating as the one to Lattimore's left knee last fall at Mississippi State.

Lattimore had surgery to repair ligaments and cartilage, then needed six months of rehabilitation and recovery before he was cleared to return.

Utah attorney general drops plans to sue BCS

Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff said he has decided not to sue the Bowl Championship Series after the decision to move to a playoff system.

Shurtleff announced last year that he was seeking antitrust law firms to join a potential federal lawsuit aimed at disbanding the BCS. But Shurtleff told Salt Lake City's KTVX-TV that he believes the threat helped prompt the four-team playoff format, which will begin in 2014.

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