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College football notebook: NCAA to restrict certain transfer rules

| Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, 8:54 p.m.

• The NCAA is putting a restriction on athletes who want to play immediately after changing schools to be closer to an ailing or injured family member. The NCAA said Friday the athlete must choose a new school within 100 miles of the family member to play right away. Otherwise, the athlete will need to sit out a year as usual. The NCAA said it was making the changes amid concerns that waiver decisions were not consistent from case to case.

• San Diego State has filled the spot on Ohio State's 2013 schedule left when Vanderbilt backed out of a scheduled game, with the date of home games against Buffalo and Florida A&M moved to accommodate the change. The Buckeyes play host the Aztecs on Sept. 7. To get the Aztecs on the schedule, Ohio State had to shift the Florida A&M game from Sept. 7 to Sept. 21 and the game against Buffalo set for Sept. 21 will now be played on Aug. 31.

• Miami (5-4, 4-2 ACC) is expected to soon decide whether to self-impose a postseason ban for the second straight year, a move that would be related to the ongoing NCAA investigation into the Hurricanes' compliance practices.

• Idaho State coach Mike Kramer has suspended a player who complained Kramer pushed him to the ground during practice Oct. 3. Idaho State officials confirmed that Kramer suspended wide receiver Derek Graves for violating team rules.

• Cody Vaz will start at quarterback for Oregon State against Arizona State on Saturday. Vaz replaces Sean Mannion, who led the Beavers to wins in their first four games but hurt his left knee and required surgery. Mannion returned as starter but threw four picks in a 20-17 loss to Washington last Saturday.

—AP

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