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College football notebook: Records drop in Tenn.-Troy shootout

| Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012, 9:18 p.m.
Tennessee wide receiver Justin Hunter makes a catch for a touchdown over Troy defensive back Josh Spence during their game Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012, in Knoxville, Tenn.

Tennessee gained a school-record 718 yards in total offense against Troy in a come-from-behind 55-48 win, but the Volunteers weren't the most prolific offense in the game.

Troy (4-5) gained 721 yards, the most yards ever allowed by Tennessee in the program's history.

The teams combined for 1,439 yards, the most ever in a Tennessee game. The previous record was 1,329, set in Tennessee's 59-31 victory over Kentucky in 1997.

The victory allowed Tennessee (4-5) to avoid its first five-game losing streak since 1988, when it lost its first six games before closing the season with five straight wins.

The Vols' defensive woes continued in a tough season for first-year defensive coordinator and former Pitt All-American Sal Sunseri. Before Saturday, Troy had never scored more than 34 points against an SEC foe.

Michigan's Robinson sits

Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson sat out Saturday's game against Minnesota with nerve damage in his right elbow that forced him out of last week's loss at Nebraska. The Wolverines made the announcement right before kickoff. Devin Gardner, who was recently moved back to quarterback from wide receiver, started in Robinson's place.

Colorado DL injures neck

Colorado defensive lineman Justin Solis was carted off the field with a neck injury after making a tackle against Stanford. Solis, a freshman from Thousand Oaks, Calif., stayed down for quite some time as medical personnel loaded him onto a stretcher as a precaution.

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