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Big Ten roundup: Michigan edges Northwestern in OT

| Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, 7:46 p.m.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Michigan's chances to win the Big Ten title got a jolt from a heave and a catch.

Devin Gardner threw a 53-yard pass to Roy Roundtree to set up Brendan Gibbons' 26-yard field goal with 2 seconds left to extend the game against Northwestern.

Gardner then scored easily from the 1 in overtime and his teammates on defense responded with a stop, giving the Wolverines a wild, 38-31, win over the Wildcats on Saturday.

“There was a lot we didn't do well,” Michigan coach Brady Hoke said. “But we did enough to win the football game.”

Barely.

Trevor Siemian threw a 15-yard pass to Tony Jones with 3:59 left in regulation to give Northwestern (6-4, 4-2) a 31-28 lead and Gardner threw an interception on the next snap.

Northwestern, though, couldn't pick up enough first downs to run out the clock and the Wolverines (7-3, 5-1) took advantage.

“We just needed to make one more play,” Wildcats coach Pat Fitzgerald said.

Wisconsin 62, Indiana 14 — In Bloomington, Ind., Montee Ball ran for 198 yards and three touchdowns, James White scored on runs of 69 and 50 yards, and Wisconsin set a school rushing record with 564 yards in a rout over Indiana.

The Badgers (7-3, 4-2) will now have a chance to claim their third straight Big Ten crown after clinching a spot in the league's title game.

Indiana (4-6, 2-4) hasn't beaten the Badgers since 2002 and had its two-game winning streak end.

Purdue 27, Iowa 24 — In Iowa City, Iowa, Paul Griggs drilled a 46-yard field goal as time expired and Purdue stunned Iowa (4-6, 2-4), snapping a five-game losing streak.

Robert Marve threw for 266 yards and two touchdowns for the Boilermakers (4-6, 1-5), who won for the first time in Iowa City in 20 years.

Minnesota 17, Illinois 3 — In Champaign, Ill., Minnesota running back Donnell Kirkwood rushed for 152 yards and two touchdowns to lead the Gophers past Illinois.

Kirkwood's 3-yard run in the third quarter broke a 3-all tie. He scored on a 12-yard run late in the fourth quarter to clinch the victory, giving his team its fourth straight win at Illinois.

Minnesota (6-4, 2-4) became bowl eligible for the first time since 2009, and won for the second time in three tries. Illinois (2-8, 0-6) has dropped seven straight, including 12 in a row within Big Ten play.

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