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No. 7 Fla. sweats $950K rent-a-win

| Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, 7:14 p.m.
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The Raiders placed cornerback Shawntae Spencer (36), a Woodland Hills and Pitt product, on season-ending injured reserve Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012. Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Louisiana-Lafayette coach Mark Hudspeth wanted his players to watch No. 7 Florida's wild, postgame celebration.

Not so they would remember the gut-wrenching feeling.

But so they would realize how close they came to pulling off one of the biggest upsets in the history of both programs.

“Anytime you see the seventh-ranked team in the country storm the field like they won the Super Bowl to beat you, you know you're doing some good things,” Hudspeth said.

The Gators (9-1) scored twice in the final 2 minutes, including once on a blocked punt in the final seconds, to beat Louisiana-Lafayette, 27-20, on Saturday.

The Rajin' Cajuns (5-4) were 27-point underdogs, were paid $950,000 to be Florida's homecoming opponent and hadn't beaten a ranked team in 16 years.

Ball nears TD record

Wisconsin running back Montee Ball rushed for three touchdowns against Indiana, moving past 1998 Heisman Trophy winner Ricky Williams into second place on the FBS all-time list. Ball now has 77 career scores and needs just one more to tie Travis Prentice of Miami (Ohio) for the career record.

ACC shootout sets mark

Georgia Tech and North Carolina blew up the scoreboard in the highest scoring game in ACC history, a 68-50 Yellow Jackets' victory.

The teams combined for 1,085 yards and 118 points in surpassing the previous ACC mark of 110 points set in Virginia's 63-47 victory over Tulane in 1968. Eleven players scored touchdowns, and Georgia Tech outgained the Tar Heels, 588-497.

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