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Kansas State, Oregon stand 1-2 in BCS standings

| Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, 9:30 p.m.
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Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein (7) celebrates a touchdown with Travis Tannahill against TCU at Amon G. Carter Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, in Fort Worth, Texas. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

NEW YORK — Kansas State and Oregon are on course to play for the BCS national championship.

After Alabama was upset by Texas A&M, the new BCS standings have the Wildcats (.9674) first and the Ducks (.9497) second.

Notre Dame (.9396) is third, not too far behind, but most likely in need of a loss by Oregon or Kansas State to reach the title game Jan. 7 in Miami.

“These teams are in their order, and the only way that order changes is if somebody gets beat,” said Jerry Palm of CBS Sports and collegebcs.com.

As for Alabama's run at three championships in four seasons, and the Southeastern Conference's string of six straight BCS titles, both are in peril.

Five SEC teams follow Alabama in the standings: Georgia, Florida, LSU, Texas A&M and South Carolina. But it will take a couple of upsets to give the SEC champion a shot to reach the BCS title game.

Kansas State is second in both BCS polls and in the computer rankings. The Wildcats have two games left — at Baylor on Saturday and home against Texas on Dec. 1, the day of most of the conference championship games.

Oregon is first in the both polls and fourth in the computer ratings. The Ducks have two more regular-season games left — against Stanford on Saturday and the next week at Oregon State. They can clinch the Pac-12 North and a spot in the conference title game with a win against Stanford. If they get there, the Ducks would play UCLA or Southern California in the league title game.

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