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College football notebook: High-scoring Ducks overcome injuries

| Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, 7:20 p.m.
Oregon wide receiver B.J. Kelley (23) celebrates his 18-yard touchdown reception with teammate Dwayne Stanford (18) during the second half of an NCAA college football game against California in Berkeley, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Oregon's defensive line was so depleted that backup tight end Koa Ka'ai and two other freshmen were pressed into emergency duty.

Big-play running back Kenjon Barner was bottled up all night, so freshman quarterback Marcus Mariota put the game on his arm.

Oregon (10-0, 7-0 Pac-12) overcame numerous hurdles to beat California, 59-17, on Saturday night to move into the top spot in The Associated Press poll.

“That's always been our philosophy,” coach Chip Kelly said of the “next man up” mantra. “We really got tested with it (Saturday). Our guys did a nice job. I can't say enough about what that young defensive line did.”

The Ducks were without four of their top five linemen coming into the game.

Commissioners meeting to discuss playoff format

Conference commissioners will meet Monday hoping to come to a decision on whether to have a six- or seven-game format for the new college football playoff.

Support has waned for adding a seventh marquee bowl game to the semifinal rotation. But there is still a strong possibility some type of automatic access to the system will be given to the Big East and four other conferences currently without a bowl of their own.

Seton Hill fires staff

Seton Hill fired football coach Joel Dolinski and his staff Sunday. Dolinski went 4-40 overall and 2-20 in the WVIAC over five seasons.

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