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College football notebook: NCAA extends Tennessee's probation

| Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, 8:54 p.m.

• The NCAA has extended Tennessee's probation by two years as part of additional penalties handed down Friday following the ruling that former football assistant coach Willie Mack Garza provided impermissible travel and lodging to a former prospect. Penalties include a public reprimand and censure plus a reduction in official visits, evaluation days and complimentary tickets to recruits on unofficial visits. This extends a probationary period that started in August 2011 and now runs through Aug. 23, 2015. Garza, who worked at Tennessee on former coach Lane Kiffin's staff, received a three-year show-cause order. The show-cause penalty means that any school that hires him must prove to the NCAA that it is rules compliant. Garza resigned as USC's secondary coach two days before the Trojans started their 2011 season.

• Iowa president Sally Mason is apologizing for the school's failure to protect athletes and employees in its handling of a former athletics department official accused of sexual harassment. Mason said in a statement Friday that the university will make changes to avoid a repeat of what she called an “isolated breakdown” in the case of Peter Gray, who resigned last week after working as associate director of athletics student services since 2002.

• Despite not allowing its star freshman quarterback to talk to the media and recently stating a “no Heisman campaign policy,” Texas A&M launched a Heisman website on behalf of Johnny Manziel this week. The website, johnnyfootball.aggieathletics.com, features a bio, videos, accolades and a nifty, interactive stat tool that allows visitors to compare Manziel's numbers with those of his Heisman competitors.

— Wire reports

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