Share This Page

Big 12 roundup: Cowboys humble No. 23 Texas Tech

| Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, 7:54 p.m.

STILLWATER, Okla. — Isaiah Anderson had a career-best 174 yards receiving and caught three long touchdown passes from Clint Chelf in his final home game, leading Oklahoma State to a 59-21 win against No. 23 Texas Tech on Saturday.

Zack Craig blocked a pair of punts, returning one for a touchdown, as the Cowboys (7-3, 5-2) won their fourth straight in the series and the second in a row in decisive fashion. The Red Raiders' 66-6 loss in last season's game was the most lopsided defeat in the program's history.

Chelf passed for 229 yards in his second career start. J.W. Walsh, who had what coach Mike Gundy called a season-ending injury four weeks ago, ran for one touchdown and threw for another out of a short-yardage package.

Seth Doege threw for 230 yards with one touchdown and two interceptions for Texas Tech (7-4, 4-4). He started the day leading the Bowl Subdivision with 34 touchdown passes this season.

The Red Raiders had a chance to pass the defending conference champions in the Big 12 standings, and perhaps secure a better bowl destination, but instead dropped their fifth straight game in Stillwater.

During a pregame ceremony, Oklahoma State observed a moment of silence to mark the one-year anniversary of the plane crash that killed women's basketball coach Kurt Budke, assistant Miranda Serna and two others.

The Cowboys had expected big things out of Anderson after a strong training camp, but he had been limited so far by an injury. He was one of the team's most experienced receivers, with the departure of first-round NFL draft pick Justin Blackmon and Josh Cooper — who also ended up in the NFL.

Iowa State 51, Kansas 23 — In Lawrence, Kan., Sam Richardson, who had not even attempted a pass all year, threw for 250 yards and four touchdowns, sparking Iowa State past Kansas and handing the Jayhawks their 20th consecutive Big 12 loss.

Richardson led the Cyclones (6-5, 3-5) to touchdowns on four straight possessions in the second quarter to taking a 38-17 lead. The redshirt freshman, virtually overlooked all year in the Cyclones' jumbled quarterback picture, had previously seen only mop-up duty in one game.

While going 23 for 27, Richardson spread his completions around to 12 different receivers. Six different Cyclones scored touchdowns.

For Kansas (1-10, 0-8), the final home game of the year sent a bedraggled class of seniors out on the same sort of sour note which has characterized their entire collegiate careers.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.