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College football notebook: Maryland nears decision on move to Big Ten

| Sunday, Nov. 18, 2012, 6:14 p.m.

Maryland's decision to stay in the ACC or join the Big Ten comes down to tradition versus money.

Given the plight of the school's struggling athletic program, the Terrapins' stature as a charter member of the ACC may not mean as much as the prospect of playing a home football game against, say, Ohio State, and being part of a league that generates more revenue.

The Board of Regents is scheduled to meet Monday to discuss joining the Big Ten. If Maryland approves the move and applies for admission, Rutgers is expected to follow suit and leave the Big East. That would leave the Big Ten with 14 schools.

An announcement on Maryland's final decision is expected this week, maybe as soon as Monday.

The addition of Maryland and Rutgers, located in New Brunswick, N.J., about 40 miles south of New York, would give the Big Ten an added presence in the East — along with Penn State — and add two huge television markets. Which explains in part why the Big Ten is courting Maryland and offering a fee to join, enough to at least partially offset the $50 million exit fee the ACC approved by vote in September after adding Notre Dame.

By leaving the ACC, Maryland would be breaking ties with many schools it has competed against since 1953.

Tennessee fires coach

Tennessee athletic director Dave Hart said Derek Dooley improved the Volunteers during the coach's three-year tenure — just not enough to keep the job.

Dooley, 44, was fired after posting a 15-21 record that lacked wins over ranked opponents and SEC foes. Dooley was 4-19 in SEC games and 0-15 against top-25 teams. Tennessee (4-7, 0-7 SEC) is 1-14 in conference play over the past two years.

Offensive coordinator Jim Chaney will coach the Vols' season finale.

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