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College football notebook: Miami self-imposes 2nd straight bowl ban

| Monday, Nov. 19, 2012, 8:46 p.m.

• Miami officials said Monday that the university is making what it called an “unprecedented decision” to self-impose a postseason ban for the second straight year, ending any chance of the Hurricanes playing in either the ACC title game or a bowl. Just like last year, Miami's decision was made with regard to the status of the ongoing NCAA investigation into the school's compliance practices. The inquiry began in 2011 after a former booster went public with allegations that he provided dozens of athletes and recruits with extra benefits such as cash and gifts. Schools often self-impose penalties with hope that the NCAA takes those measures into account when doling out punishment.

• UTEP coachMike Price is retiring after a 31-year career notable for two Rose Bowl bids at Washington State and a drinking binge that cost him the Alabama job before he ever coached a game for the Crimson Tide.

John Gagliardi, the winningest coach in college football history, announced his retirement from Division III St. John's in Minnesota. The 86-year-old started coaching in 1949 and spent the past six decades at the private school. He retires with a record of 489-138-11 and surpassed Eddie Robinson for the career coaching victories record in 2003, piling up four national titles at St. John's along the way.

• No. 6 Florida will have quarterbackJeff Driskel back against rival and 10th-ranked Florida State. Driskel sat out Saturday's 23-0 win over Jacksonville State because of a sprained right ankle.

• Minnesota coach Jerry Kill said top receiver A.J. Barker's abrupt departure from the team Sunday was because he was unhappy with being disciplined, not because of any mistreatment.

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