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College football notebook: Michigan fan plans to see 500th straight game

| Friday, Nov. 23, 2012, 9:44 p.m.

• A 67-year-old retired engineer has plans to watch Michigan's 20th-ranked football team play in person for the 500th straight time Saturday at No. 4 Ohio State. Bob MacLean said he has attended every game the Wolverines have played from their 1971 game against rival Ohio State through their last one against Iowa. “I missed the next-to-last game in 1971 for a wedding and haven't missed one since,” he said. MacLean said when Michigan has had games far away from his Ann Arbor home, such as in Hawaii, he planned vacations around the game.

• The Apple Cup is back with Washington State after one of the most stunning finishes in the history of the series. Andrew Furney's 27-yard field goal was the difference, as WSU (3-9, 1-8 Pac-12) beat the Huskies, 31-28, on Friday to snap an eight-game losing streak. Washington State came from a 28-10 fourth-quarter deficit and survived a missed field goal by the Huskies (7-5, 5-4) as time expired. Thousands of WSU fans stormed the field after the victory, their first over Washington's Steve Sarkisian, who had won three straight Apple Cups.

• Reggie Dunn got his hands on the ball one time, and that's all he needed to send Utah past Colorado, 42-35, in Boulder, Colo., sealing the worst season in the Buffaloes' history. Dunn's NCAA-record fifth career 100-yard kickoff return — fourth this season — broke a 35-35 tie. The Utes (5-7, 3-6 Pac-12) sent the Buffaloes (1-11, 1-8) to their worst finish since the school's inaugural 0-4 campaign in 1890.

• Shane Carden's 1-yard TD run in the second overtime lifted East Carolina over Marshall, 65-59, in Greenville, N.C., and kept the Pirates' Conference USA title hopes alive. The Pirates (8-4, 7-1) will advance to play Tulsa for the crown if Alabama-Birmingham beats Central Florida on Saturday.

—AP

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