Share This Page

No. 3 Georgia clinches spot in SEC title game

| Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, 8:14 p.m.

ATHENS, Ga. — The Georgia Bulldogs collected a trophy at midfield for another win over their state rival, then got some encouragement from the governor in their quest for a bigger reward.

No. 1.

Aaron Murray threw two touchdown passes, Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall each ran for a pair of TDs, and third-ranked Georgia stayed right in the thick of the national championship race with a 42-10 rout of Georgia Tech on Saturday.

Gov. Nathan Deal presented the “Governor's Cup” to the Bulldogs (11-1) after they beat the Yellow Jackets for the 11th time in 12 years. He congratulated both teams on a “great game” before turning toward the jubilant Georgia players.

“Keep up the good work,” Deal said. “We're looking for a national championship.”

Georgia is two wins away.

The Bulldogs will face No. 2 Alabama for the SEC championship in Atlanta next Saturday. The winner of that contest will likely advance to play in the BCS title game on Jan. 7.

“This is everything,” Georgia linebacker Christian Robinson said of the SEC finals. “This is what you play for.”

Georgia Tech (6-6), amazingly enough, still has a chance to win the ACC title next weekend and earn a BCS bowl bid. The Yellow Jackets clinched a spot in the championship game against No. 10 Florida State after Miami pulled out from postseason consideration.

The Yellow Jackets won't have any chance of beating the Seminoles if they don't turn in a much better effort than this.

“Well, I look at it like another opportunity,” Johnson said. “We'll see how they respond. You don't get those opportunities very often, so you need to take advantage of them.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.