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Navy continues its dominance over Army

| Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, 6:58 p.m.

PHILADELPHIA — Keenan Reynolds extended Navy's dominance against Army, scoring the winning touchdown late in the fourth quarter in a 17-13 victory in the 113th rivalry game Saturday.

Navy (8-4) beat Army for the 11th straight time and won the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy awarded to the team with the best record in games among the three service academies. Army and Navy each beat Air Force, putting the prestigious trophy up for grabs in the regular-season finale for the first time since 2005.

Army (2-10) hasn't hoisted the CIC trophy since 1996.

The Black Knights came close, but Navy recovered a late fumble, and Reynolds' 8-yard rushing score made it 17-13. Navy caught a break when Army missed a late field-goal attempt.

Reynolds quickly found Ejay Turner down the sideline for a 49-yard gain. Reynolds then escaped a rush and followed with the touchdown touchdown run with 4:41 left in the game.

The Black Knights were in this one until the final drive. Army had driven to the 14 when fullback Larry Dixon fumbled on a sloppy exchange. Navy recovered, and the Midshipmen went wild and rushed the field.

The CIC trophy was coming back to the Naval Academy for a record 13th time after a two-year stint at Air Force.

Late in the third, Army's James Kelly stripped the ball, and linebacker Alex Meier recovered to give the Black Knights the ball at Navy's 37. Eric Osteen kicked a 21-yard field goal 10 plays later for a 13-10 lead. Osteen, however, was wide left on a 37-yard attempt with 6:57 left in the game. Navy made them pay.

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