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Texas A&M quarterback Manziel becomes first freshman Heisman Trophy winner

| Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, 9:12 p.m.
Getty Images for the Heisman Tru
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 08: Quarterback Johnny Manziel of the Texas A&M University Aggies poses with the Heisman Memorial Trophy after being named the 78th Heisman Memorial Trophy Award winner at the Best Buy Theater on December 8, 2012 in New York City. NOTE TO USER: Photos are for editorial usage only from December 8th to 22nd. No sales, no archive. (Photo by Kelly Kline/Getty Images for the Heisman Trust)

NEW YORK — Johnny Football just got himself a way cooler nickname: Johnny Heisman.

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel became the first freshman to win the Heisman Trophy, taking college football's top individual prize Saturday night after a record-breaking debut.

Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o finished a distant second, and Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein was third in the voting. In a Heisman race with two nontraditional candidates, Manziel broke through the class barrier and kept Te'o from becoming the first purely defensive player to win the award.

Manziel drew 474 first-place votes and 2,029 points from the panel of media members and former winners.

“I have been dreaming about this since I was a kid, running around the backyard pretending I was Doug Flutie, throwing Hail Marys to my dad,” he said after hugging his parents and kid sister.

Manziel seemed incredibly calm after his name was announced, hardly resembling the guy who dashes around the football field on Saturdays. He simply bowed his head and later gave the trophy a quick kiss.

“I wish my whole team could be up here with me,” he said with a wide smile.

Te'o had 321 first-place votes and 1,706 points, and Klein received 60 firsts and 894 points.

Just a few days after turning 20, Manziel proved times have truly changed in college football and that experience can be overrated.

For years, seniors dominated the award named after John Heisman, the pioneering Georgia Tech coach from the early 1900s. In the 1980s, juniors started becoming common winners. Tim Tebow became the first sophomore to win it in 2007, and two more won it in the next two seasons.

Adrian Peterson had come closest as a freshman, finishing second to Southern Cal quarterback Matt Leinart in 2004. But it took 78 years for a newbie to take home the big bronze statue. Johnny Football really can do it all.

Peterson was a true freshman for Oklahoma. As a redshirt freshmen, Manziel attended school and practiced with the team last year but didn't play in any games.

He's the second player from Texas A&M to win the Heisman, joining John David Crow from 1957, and he did so without the slightest hint of preseason hype. Manziel didn't even win the starting job until two weeks before the season.

Who needs hype when you can fill-up a highlight reel the way Manziel can?

With daring dashes and elusive improvisation, Manziel broke 2010 Heisman winner Cam Netwon's SEC record with 4,600 total yards, led the Aggies to a 10-2 record in their first season in the SEC and orchestrated an upset at then-No. 1 Alabama in November that stamped him as legit.

He has thrown for 3,419 yards and 24 touchdowns and run for 1,181 yards and 19 more scores to become the first freshman, first SEC player and fifth player overall to throw for 3,000 yards and run for 1,000 in a season.

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