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Expectations will soar next season for Heisman winner Manziel

AP
Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel poses with the Heisman Trophy after becoming the first freshman to win the award. AP

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By The Associated Press
Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, 5:54 p.m.
 

NEW YORK — Heisman Trophy history suggests it will never get better for Johnny Manziel than it did this season. In the 78-year history of the Heisman, only one player has one more than one: Ohio State's Archie Griffin in 1974 and '75.

But even if another Heisman is not in Johnny Football's his future, there's still plenty left for him and Texas A&M to achieve before he's done.

“First and foremost, there's the Cotton Bowl,” Manziel said Saturday night. The 10th-ranked Aggies play No. 12 Oklahoma in Dallas on Jan. 4. “From there, I have to be the guy who starts the motor for a run at the national title next year. That's our goal. If more awards come, they come.”

That goal doesn't seem farfetched after the Aggies' scintillating first season playing in the SEC. Manziel was joined on stage at his post-ceremony news conference by coach Kevin Sumlin and A&M offensive coordinator Kliff Kingsbury, the former star quarterback at Texas Tech.

Manziel turned 20 this week. Kingsbury is 33. Sumlin is 48. It's not hard to look at them and see the future of the SEC. Especially after the Aggies went 10-2 this season and left no doubt that their fast-paced, spread offense would not sputter in the big bad SEC.

Texas A&M averaged 552 yards per game and 44 points. Manziel smashed Cam Newton's total offense record with 4,600 yards passing and rushing.

“You look what our offense did this year. People didn't really think that we were going to have much success in the SEC. They said these smashmouth, hard-nose defenses and this gimmick offense ... won't work.

“Our offense with coach Sumlin and what coach Kingsbury did, I love it. I love everything about it. It's definitely something that can work if you have the right people in place.”

Kingsbury said he and Sumlin didn't quite realize what they had in Manziel early on.

“All spring coach Sumlin would blow the whistle because the defense was close, and (Manziel would) come over ... spike the ball, ‘God! They wouldn't have got me.' I'm like, ‘OK, Johnny, sure they wouldn't have got you.' Come to find out they wouldn't have got him.”

Potentially, Texas A&M will have many of its best pieces in place next season. Receiver Mike Evans is a freshman, too, and has future first-round draft pick written all over him. Texas A&M has an offensive line that rivals Alabama's with two stud tackles in Luke Joeckel and Jake Matthews. Both are juniors.

If Aggies fans are allowed to dream, there's no reason why A&M's offense can't be even better next season. Even if Manziel's numbers aren't.

Manziel could be as good or better next season but not be able to put up those same video-game numbers.

It's a common tale in Heisman history.

BYU's Ty Detmer won the award as a junior in 1990 but finished a distance third behind Desmond Howard in 1991.

“The hard part's winning it again because the expectation level goes up,” Detmer said. “I felt like my senior year I was a much better player than my junior year. Smarter, less turnovers. Didn't have as good of stats, but I felt like I was a better player my senior year. But the expectations were different.”

Expectations will by sky high in College Station, Texas, next season. The move to the SEC, hiring Sumlin and the second Heisman in the history of the program — first since John David Crow in 1957 — have Aggies' hopes soaring.

“The award for the program is huge,” Sumlin said. “There's a lot of programs out there that don't have one. It took a long time for Texas A&M to get to two.”

Maybe Manziel can buck the trend and A&M won't have to wait so long to add a third.

 

 
 


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