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Syracuse's Boeheim becomes third coach with 900 wins

| Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, 9:36 p.m.

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Jim Boeheim became the third Division I men's coach to reach 900 wins as No. 3 Syracuse beat Detroit, 72-68, on Monday.

Boeheim, in his 37th year at his alma mater, is 900-304 and joined an elite fraternity. Mike Krzyzewski (936) and Bob Knight (902) are the only other men's Division I coaches to win that many games.

James Southerland had 22 points for Syracuse (10-0), which increased its home winning streak to 30 games, the longest in the nation.

No. 12 Missouri 102, South Carolina State 51 — In Columbia, Mo. Jabari Brown, playing in his first game since Nov. 17, 2011 when he was a freshman at Oregon, scored 12 points to lead Missouri. The point guard became eligible at the end of the first semester.

Phil Pressey's jumper 17 seconds into the game gave Missouri (9-1) the lead for good.

No. 21 UNLV 62, UTEP 60— In El Paso, Texas, Anthony Marshall scored 13 points, and Bryce DeJean-Jones added 12 to lead UNLV (9-1).

UTEP's Konner Tucker's last-second 3-point attempt bounced up and off the rim.

No. 22 Notre Dame 74, IPFW 62 — In South Bend, Ind., Pat Connaughton scored 18 points to lead Notre Dame (10-1).

Jack Cooley had 14 points and eight rebounds, and Scott Martin scored 13 points on 3-for-5 shooting from 3-point range for the Fighting Irish.

District women

Central Michigan 96, Robert Morris 56 — In Mt. Pleasant, Mich., junior forward Artemis Spanou scored 22 points and had a career-high 17 rebounds, but that couldn't keep the Colonials from falling to 0-9.

Freshman guard Ashley Ravelli eclipsed her career high for the second consecutive game, scoring 18 points. She hit six 3-pointers in 11 attempts and also had three steals and two assists.

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