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Perfect Buckeyes get left behind

| Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012, 8:18 p.m.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Jack Mewhort loves college football. Yet he likely won't go out of his way to watch a single bowl game in the coming days.

What's the point, the thoughtful, red-haired Ohio State offensive lineman says, not really seeking an answer.

“Now that the season is over, you can sit around and think to yourself a little bit,” he said. “Your mind kind of wanders. We accomplished everything we possibly could.

“But you've got to keep the demons out.”

The Buckeyes aren't allowed, because of NCAA violations committed by those no longer with the team, to play in a bowl game. They did all they could during the 2012 season, going 12-0.

So while Notre Dame and one-loss Alabama fight it out for the national championship, and while lesser teams play in sunny climes and get maximum exposure, Mewhort and the rest of the Buckeyes are left with their thoughts.

Urban Meyer is perfectly willing to move on. But that doesn't mean the Ohio State coach still doesn't have a lingering regret: What might have been.

“It's very difficult,” Meyer said. “You can't help but think about it.”

There's plenty of regret to go around at Ohio State these days. There's regret that former coach Jim Tressel, who wrote books about integrity, morals and leading a Christian life, found out in 2010 that some of his best players took money from a suspected drug dealer and yet did nothing about it. He played those players anyway and they were later ruled ineligible for taking cash and free tattoos. A 12-1 season, including a Sugar Bowl victory two years ago, was wiped off the books.

Tressel was forced out of the job in disgrace after 10 years and all of the players involved either graduated, moved on to the NFL or went elsewhere.

There's also regret that athletic director Gene Smith, who once worked on the NCAA's Committee on Infractions, didn't give up a meaningless Gator Bowl bid after the 2011 season as a pre-emptive strike to mollify the NCAA.

Smith, for one, refuses to play the blame game. He said he doesn't feel any remorse for his decision whatsoever.

“No. As I've said before, with the information we had at the time we made the decisions at the time that we felt were the best decisions,” he said.

There are other considerations, of course. The lack of a bowl game denies Ohio State weeks of practice that even a mediocre bowl-bound team with a 6-6 record gets.

Of course, the players affected the most by the bowl ban are Ohio State's seniors. They overcame doubts and questions to post just the sixth unbeaten and untied season in the program's 123 seasons. Yet, for the sins of others, they're deprived of the reward of going on a good bowl trip.

“I can't stay here and live in the past and wish and hope,” senior linebacker Etienne Sabino said. “There's nothing I can control. I try not to think about it.”

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