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College football bowl roundup: No. 6 Georgia blitzes Nebraska

| Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, 6:50 p.m.

ORLANDO, Fla. — Aaron Murray threw five touchdown passes to set a Georgia bowl record, including two in the fourth quarter, as the sixth-ranked Bulldogs beat No. 23 Nebraska, 45-31, in the Capital One Bowl on Tuesday.

Murray shook off a pair of first-half interceptions, including one returned for a touchdown, and passed for 427 yards — also a Bulldogs' bowl record — against the nation's top-ranked passing defense.

Georgia (12-2) reached 12 wins for the third time in school history.

Nebraska (10-4) lost its third consecutive bowl game, and finished the two season with two straight woeful defensive performances. The Cornhuskers lost the Big Ten championship game, 70-31.

The Cornhuskers led, 24-23, at the half, but they committed two of their three turnovers in the final 30 minutes.

Outback Bowl

No. 11 South Carolina 33, No. 19 Michigan 28 — In Tampa, Fla., Dylan Thompson came off the bench to throw a 32-yard touchdown pass with 11 seconds remaining, giving South Carolina a victory.

Thompson replaced Connor Shaw during the winning drive, covering the final 43 yards after the Gamecocks' starter began the march from his own 30. Devin Gardner's third TD pass had given Michigan a 28-27 lead.

Shaw threw for 227 yards and two touchdowns after missing South Carolina's regular-season finale against Clemson with a left foot sprain. Thompson led the Gamecocks (11-2) to a victory over their archrival and threw for 117 yards and two TDs as a backup Tuesday.

Gardner threw for 214 yards in his fifth start for Michigan (8-5) since Denard Robinson injured his right elbow in late October. Robinson took some snaps at quarterback, but lined up mostly at running back and rushed for 100 yards on 23 carries.

Heart of Dallas Bowl

Oklahoma State 58, Purdue 14 — In Dallas, Clint Chelf threw three of Oklahoma State's five touchdown passes, and the Cowboys shook off a disappointing Big 12 finish.

The Cowboys, a year removed from a Fiesta Bowl win that capped the best season in school history, forced five turnovers and had another short touchdown drive after a 64-yard punt return from Josh Stewart.

It was the biggest bowl win for Oklahoma State since coach Mike Gundy was the quarterback in a 62-14 rout of Wyoming in the 1988 Holiday Bowl.

The Cowboys (8-5) missed out on upper-tier bowls after narrow losses in their last two Big 12 games.

Purdue's Robert Mavre didn't get to 100 yards passing until Oklahoma State led, 45-0, as the Boilermakers (6-7) fell to 0-4 on New Year's Day.

Gator Bowl

No. 21 Northwestern 34, Mississippi State 20 — In Jacksonville, Fla., behind huge interceptions early and late, Northwestern beat Mississippi State and snapped college football's longest postseason losing streak.

The Wildcats (10-3) won their first bowl game since 1949, snapping a nine-game losing skid that was tied for the longest in NCAA history.

They also celebrated double-digit victories for the first time since the 1995 Rose Bowl season.

Quentin Williams returned an interception 29 yards for a touchdown on the third play of the game, and Nick Vanhoose set up a late touchdown with a 39-yard interception return. Northwestern's two-quarterback system kept the Bulldogs (8-4) off balance most of the day.

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