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College notebook: NCAA announces 'improper conduct' with Miami investigation

| Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, 1:48 p.m.
In this Jan. 17, 2013, file photo, NCAA President Mark Emmert speaks at the organization's annual convention in Grapevine, Texas. The NCAA is revealing that it has found 'an issue of improper conduct' within its own enforcement program during its investigation into the compliance practices of Miami's athletic department. Emmert has ordered an external review of the enforcement program. Miami will not receive its notice of allegations until that review is complete. AP file photo

The latest black eye for college sports belongs to the NCAA.

In an embarrassing blow to its watchdog image, the NCAA said Wednesday its enforcement staff had botched the high-profile investigation of the University of Miami by improperly conducting at least two depositions while working with an attorney for disgraced booster Nevin Shapiro. Miami has been under investigation since the convicted Ponzi scheme mastermind said he had provided improper benefits to Hurricanes recruits.

NCAA president Mark Emmert said he was disappointed and angry with the misstep, acknowledging he had not seen anything like this since taking the job 2 12 years ago.

He said none of the evidence collected improperly would be used against Miami and that the long-awaited notice of allegations would be delayed until after an external review is completed in about two weeks.

• A spokesman for Central Florida said the NCAA will hear its appeal of a one-year postseason ban in football. UCF president John Hitt, athletic director Todd Stansbury and others will attend the hearing Thursday in Indianapolis. It is the lone penalty UCF challenged as part of sanctions levied in July for recruiting violations in football and basketball. UCF received a one-year postseason ban in basketball, a $50,000 fine, five years' probation, a reduction of basketball scholarships and limits on football recruiting.

• Louisville football coach Charlie Strong and the university agreed on an eight-year contract extension that will pay Strong an annual base salary of $3.7 million plus incentives worth at least $583,333 for reaching the BCS championship game. Strong's third season with Louisville ended with a 33-23 upset of Florida in the Sugar Bowl. The Cardinals (11-2) were ranked 13th in the final poll and won a share of the Big East title.

• North Carolina suspended guard Leslie McDonald for three games. Coach Roy Williams said McDonald “did not do what we expect of our student-athletes.”

• A judge ordered two teens accused of scribbling racist graffiti on a sidewalk in front of Bowling Green men's basketball coach Louis Orr's house to meet with him. Authorities said they wrote “white power” and drew a swastika with chalk in front of the black coach's house in October.

— AP

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