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College basketball roundup: Michigan makes case for No. 1

| Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, 8:38 p.m.

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Trey Burke scored 19 points, and No. 2 Michigan never trailed after the opening minutes of a 74-60 win Sunday over Illinois that could push the Wolverines to No. 1 in the nation for the first time since the 1992-93 season.

Duke's lopsided loss to Miami earlier in the week opened the door for a new No. 1 when the AP poll comes out Monday, and Michigan put itself in position to take the top spot.

Glenn Robinson III scored 14 points for the Wolverines (19-1, 6-1 Big Ten). Nik Stauskas and Tim Hardaway Jr. added 12 each.

No. 7 Indiana 75, No. 13 Michigan St. 70 — In Bloomington, Ind., Victor Oladipo took control for Indiana in the opening minutes and never let go, finishing with 21 points, seven rebounds and six steals, leading the Hoosiers over Michigan State.

Michigan State (17-4, 6-2) was led by Gary Harris, Indiana's 2012 Mr. Basketball, who had 21 points and made five 3-pointers. Adreian Payne added 18 points and nine rebounds and doubled his season total by making three 3's.

No. 17 Creighton 81, Southern Illinois 51 — In Carbondale, Ill., Doug McDermott had 21 points and 10 rebounds as Creighton shot 63 percent, bouncing back from a pair of road losses.

Gregory Echenique added 12 points and 11 rebounds, and the Bluejays (18-3, 7-2 Missouri Valley) were 12 for 20 from 3-point range.

Desmar Jackson has 16 points for Southern Illinois (8-12, 1-8).

No. 25 Miami 71, Florida St. 47 — In Coral Gables, Fla., Trey McKinney Jones scored 15 points, and the ACC leaders won their seventh game in a row.

Miami (15-3, 6-0) is off to its best start in the conference, alone atop the standings, and is 9-0 at home. Florida State (11-8, 3-3) fell to 0-3 this season against ranked teams.

District women

No. 8 Penn St. 71, Ohio St.56 — In Columbus, Ohio, Maggie Lucas scored 14 of her 18 points in the second half, and No. 8 Penn State saved its best for last to win its 14th consecutive Big Ten game, a school record.

The victory, in which they outscored the Buckeyes, 43-19, after halftime, also gave them their fastest start since the 1993-94 season.

Alex Bentley scored 16 points, and Nikki Greene had 11 points and 13 rebounds for Penn State (17-2, 7-0 Big Ten), which has won 11 in a row since a 67-52 loss at Connecticut on Dec. 6. It's the sixth-longest winning streak in program history.

Duquesne 68, Fordham 50— Wumi Agunbiade had 22 points, and Orsi Szecsi had 16 points and 10 rebounds to help give the Dukes a 5-0 start in the Atlantic 10.

The loss was the first for the Rams in the A-10.

April Robinson added 13 points and four assists for Duquesne.

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