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College notebook: Missteps in Miami probe spur firing

| Monday, Feb. 18, 2013, 2:30 p.m.

The NCAA's homegrown scandal is hitting hard at headquarters.

President Mark Emmert announced Monday that Julie Roe Lach, the vice president of enforcement, is leaving and will soon be replaced by private attorney Jonathan Duncan after her role in the botched investigation of Miami. He suggested the NCAA's board of directors and executive committee could hold him accountable for this mess, and it's not over yet.

After releasing a 55-page report detailing how the NCAA violated its own practices and policies by paying the attorney for convicted Ponzi-schemer Nevin Shapiro thousands of dollars to help with the Miami case, Emmert spent more than an hour doing damage control on the latest black eye to hit the organization.

Cal coach suspended

California coach Mike Montgomery was reprimanded by the Pac-12 for shoving one of his own players in the chest during a game.

The conference didn't say what specific punishment Montgomery received for his actions Sunday, although he won't be suspended.

The confrontation happened during a timeout in the second half of Cal's 76-68 win over USC when Montgomery yelled at star guard Allen Crabbe for nonchalant play and then shoved him in the chest with both hands.

Former Duke star dies

Duke said former star Phil Henderson has died.

Henderson, 44, was a senior captain and the leading scorer on the 1989-90 Duke basketball team that lost to UNLV in the national championship game.

Ex-coach faces tax charges

Former N.C. State basketball coach Sidney Lowe was arrested and charged with failing to file his North Carolina state income taxes.

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