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College basketball roundup: Burke's late heroics lift Michigan

| Sunday, March 3, 2013, 8:27 p.m.
Michigan guard Trey Burke, foreground, and teammate forward Mitch McGary celebrate their 58-57 win over Michigan State in an NCAA college basketball game in Ann Arbor, Mich., Sunday, March 3, 2013. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Trey Burke stole the ball from Keith Appling near midcourt and went in alone for a dunk with 22 seconds remaining, then made another steal in the final seconds to give No. 4 Michigan a pulsating 58-57 win over No. 9 Michigan State on Sunday.

The Spartans (22-7, 11-5 Big Ten) had the ball with the shot clock off at 56-all, but Burke's first big defensive play enabled Michigan (24-5, 11-5) to take the lead. After Derrick Nix made one of two free throws and Mitch McGary missed the front end of a 1-and-1 for Michigan, Burke stole a pass by Gary Harris to end it.

The Michigan State loss clinches at least a share of the Big Ten title for Indiana.

The Wolverines avenged a 75-52 loss at Michigan State last month.

Burke had 21 points and eight assists. Michigan won despite going 0 for 12 from 3-point range, which seemed like an impossible turn of events after the defensively maligned Wolverines lost at Penn State on Wednesday night.

Michigan trailed, 31-28, at halftime but shut down Michigan State for extended stretches and eventually took a 52-42 lead when Burke made two free throws with 4:36 to play.

The Spartans rallied behind relentless offensive rebounding. Michigan State had 19 offensive rebounds for the game, and the Spartans nearly won despite 18 turnovers.

Keith Appling pulled Michigan State even at 56 when he made two free throws with 54.8 seconds remaining, and when McGary stepped on the baseline, the Spartans had a chance to hold for the last shot.

Instead, they weren't even able to get a play going. Burke gambled a bit, going for the steal, and he put the Wolverines ahead, 58-56.

Nix was fouled with 8.8 seconds left, but he missed the first free throw. After he made the second, the Spartans fouled McGary, who couldn't add to Michigan's lead. Michigan State called a timeout with 4.9 seconds left but never got a shot off.

The Spartans have lost three straight — to Indiana, Ohio State and Michigan — and their tough stretch isn't over. They face Wisconsin next.

Purdue 69, No. 17 Wisconsin 56 — In Madison, Wis., D.J. Byrd scored 16 of his 22 points in the second half, and Purdue upset Wisconsin.

Terone Johnson added 16 points for the Boilermakers (14-15, 7-9 Big Ten), who had lost three straight road games and four of five overall. Purdue took control with a 21-3 run in the second half during which Byrd had nine points and Johnson eight.

Jared Berggren scored 13 points, and Ryan Evans and Sam Dekker, had 10 apiece for the Badgers (20-9, 11-5), who had won six of their previous seven.

Women

No. 7 Penn St. 82, No. 20 Nebraska 67 — In Lincoln, Neb., Maggie Lucas scored 34 points to lead seventh-ranked Penn State, which clinched the Lady Lions' second straight outright Big Ten championship and ending the Cornhuskers' 10-game win streak.

The Nittany Lions will get a bye in the first round when the Big Ten Tournament begins on Thursday at the Sears Centre Arena in Hoffman Estates, Ill. Penn State will face the winner of the Minnesota-Ohio State game at 7 p.m. Friday.

Lucas made a career-high eight 3-pointers, with four of them coming in a bunch to help the Lady Lions stretch their lead in the first half and three more keeping the Huskers at bay early in the second.

Penn State (24-4, 14-2) improved to 6-1 against ranked opponents and secured its best conference record since going 15-1 in 2003-04.

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