Share This Page

Plum grad Yurovsky settles in with No. 8-ranked Michigan women's tennis team

| Sunday, March 10, 2013, 12:31 a.m.
University of Michigan
Michigan tennis player Ronit Yurovsky, a Plum graduate, is ranked No. 21 in the country by ITA. She was named Big Ten Athlete of the Week for women's tennis twice as a freshman. (University of Michigan)
UM Photography, M. Vloet
Michigan tennis player Ronit Yurovsky, a Plum graduate

While her hometown of Plum was getting blanketed by eight inches of snow, and her college town of Ann Arbor was shivering from frigid temperatures, Ronit Yurovsky was somewhat distracted.

Excuse her — she was off working on her tan on the West Coast.

A freshman tennis player at Michigan, Yurovsky and her teammates were on spring break last week in La Jolla, Calif.

“We're staying right off the beach,” she said. “I'm thinking, I kind of feel bad. Then, I'm like, nah.”

Yurovsky has been soaking up the sunshine on the court, as well. Stellar play has drawn praise from coaches, which has led to elevated playing time, and the conference has recognized her by way of awards.

Yurovsky picked up her second Big Ten Women's Tennis Athlete of the Week award after helping the Wolverines to a 4-3 victory of No. 2-ranked Duke — the program's biggest upset.

Yurovsky, a two-time PIAA champion and three-time WPIAL champion at Plum, is 19-5 playing singles and has won 15 of her last 16 matches.

She is 4-2 in doubles.

“Ronit has been incredible. For a freshman to come in and play high in the lineup and come through for us has been huge,” Michigan coach Ronni Bernstein said. “She also brings so many positive things to the team off the court. She is always in a good mood and brings so much positive energy to our program. She is also one of our hardest workers.”

Yurovsky, ranked No. 33 individually in the country, said her seamless transition to college tennis is a credit to time management.

“In the beginning of the fall, I took some time to get adjusted,” she said. “College is a lot different from junior tennis. You're on your own. The little things add up.”

Yurovsky also is adjusting to playing back-to-back matches on weekends, often a standard schedule in Division I.

But adjustments seem easier when she's in her element.

“In juniors, it was a tournament here or there,” she said. “When I step on the court, I don't worry about anything else. I try not to let outside things bother me.”

Yurovsky said the Duke win has given the Wolverines added confidence — and has boosted them to No. 8 in the NCAA rankings.

“It was huge,” she said. “Going into the match, we knew we had a chance. We knew each of our girls had potential, so we knew we had a chance. Now we see what we're capable of.”

Bill Beckner Jr. is the local sports editor of the Valley News Dispatch. Reach him at bbeckner@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.