Share This Page

College basketball notebook: San Jose State fires its men's basketball coach

| Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 8:36 p.m.

• San Jose State fired men's coach George Nessman after eight seasons with the Spartans. The move was announced Wednesday, a day after San Jose State's season ended with a 67-49 loss to UTSA in the WAC Tournament. The Spartans went 9-20 this season, their second straight campaign with only nine wins. Nessman had an 86-161 record in his tenure.

• VCU said reserve center D.J. Haley left the program to focus on academic interests. Coach Shaka Smart said the junior indicated “his heart is no longer invested in basketball,” and he wishes him the best. The 7-foot, 250-pound Haley has played in 102 games for VCU, starting 48 times. He averaged 2.1 points and 2.5 rebounds.

• Kentucky coach John Calipari says freshman center Nerlens Noel is “doing fine” after surgery on his left knee to repair a torn ACL. Calipari said in a Facebook post Wednesday that Noel called him after Tuesday's operation performed by famed orthopedic surgeon James Andrews in Gulf Breeze, Fla. The coach says the surgery “went well” for his 6-foot-10 center, who suffered the season-ending injury Feb. 12.

• Ohio point guard D.J. Cooper was named the Mid-American Conference's player of the year, and Akron's Keith Dambrot is the league's top coach. Cooper beat out Zips center Zeke Marshall (McKeesport) for the award in voting by a media panel. Cooper averaged 14.2 points and 7.2 assists for the Bobcats. Cooper is the MAC's career leader in assists, and he's the only Division I player in history to have at least 2,000 points, 900 assists, 600 rebounds and 300 career steals. Marshall averaged 13 points, 6.9 rebounds and 3.6 blocks.

— AP

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.