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Florida Gulf Coast shocks No. 2 seed Georgetown

| Friday, March 22, 2013, 10:30 p.m.
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Mikael Hopkins of the Georgetown Hoyas stands on the court in the second half with his head down agaist the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles during the second round of the 2013 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Wells Fargo Center on March 22, 2013, in Philadelphia.
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Brett Comer and Sherwood Brown of the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles react after Brown was fouled in the second half against the Georgetown Hoyas during the second round of the 2013 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Wells Fargo Center on March 22, 2013, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

PHILADELPHIA — Florida Gulf Coast sure made an entrance at the NCAA tournament.

A school that hasn't even celebrated its first 20-year reunion yet and is in just its second season of being eligible for Division I postseason, busted a load of brackets with a 78-68 victory over second-seeded Georgetown on Friday night in the second round of the South Regional.

The Eagles used a 21-2 run in the second half to pull away from the Hoyas and then held on in the final minute to become the seventh No. 15 seed to beat a No. 2.

Sherwood Brown scored 24 points, and Bernard Thompson had 23 to lead Florida Gulf Coast, the champions of the Atlantic Sun Conference

FGCU (25-10) will play the winner of the game between seventh-seeded San Diego State and No. 10 Oklahoma in the third round Sunday.

A night after America's oldest university, Harvard, pulled off a major upset over fourth-seeded New Mexico, one of its youngest — FGCU's first student was admitted in 1997 — got one that was even bigger.

The Eagles' big run gave them a 52-33 lead with 12:28 to play. The Hoyas (25-7) staged a furious rally to get within 72-68 with 52 seconds left, but the Eagles went 6 of 10 from the free-throw line to seal it.

“In the second half, we pushed the ball, we got out, we ran, we made shots, got some alley-oop dunks to energize the crowd. I'm very proud of our players,” said coach Andy Enfield, whose wife, supermodel Amanda Marcum, was shown several times on the arena's big screen.

For those who don't know FCGU, and that was probably plenty of people as of Friday afternoon, Florida Gulf Coast is a state university in Fort Myers with an enrollment of about 12,000 students.

This is FGCU's first tournament and Georgetown's 29th, including the 1984 national championship. But the Eagles did beat Miami earlier this season.

The Eagles charged at their fans when the game ended and — after some of them shook hands with Hall of Famer and TV analyst Reggie Miller — it was a celebration that could be felt all the way to back to campus.

Big East Player of the Year Otto Porter Jr. had 13 points on 5-of-17 shooting and 11 rebounds.

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