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NCAA Tournament roundup: Marquette ousts cold-shooting Miami

| Thursday, March 28, 2013, 10:18 p.m.
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Marquette's Chris Otule reacts after a play against the Miami during a Sweet 16 game Thursday, March 28, 2013, at Verizon Center in Washington.
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Syracuse guard Michael Carter-Williams reacts after beating Indiana in their NCAA Tournament game Thursday, March 28, 2013, in Washington.

WASHINGTON — Vander Blue's buzzer-beater came at the end of the first half. For a change, Marquette didn't need one at the end of the game.

After sweating through a pair of edge-of-your-seat comebacks in the NCAA tournament, Blue and the Golden Eagles figured out how to put one away early, earning Marquette's first trip to the Elite Eight since 2003 with a 71-61 win over Miami on Thursday night.

Blue, who spurred the rallies that beat Davidson by one and Butler by two, finished with 14 points. He wasn't Marquette's leading scorer — that was Jamil Wilson with 16 — but it was Blue's offensive and defensive energy that pushed the Golden Eagles to a double-digit lead in the first half, a spread Miami never came close to making up.

The game wasn't hard to decipher. Marquette could shoot; Miami couldn't. The Hurricanes (29-7) had sentiment on their side, returning to the arena where coach Jim Larranaga led mid-major George Mason to the Final Four seven years ago, but they made only 35 percent of their field goals and missed 18 of 26 3-pointers.

Marquette, meanwhile, shot 54 percent, a stark turnaround from its 38 percent rate from the first two games in the tournament. Davante Gardner added 14 points, with 12 coming in the second half when the Golden Eagles were comfortably ahead.

Shane Larkin scored 14 points to lead the No. 2 seed Hurricanes, whose NCAA run to the round of 16 matched the best in school history.

“We just shot the ball so poorly,” Larranaga said, also lamenting some injuries that hindered his team's preparation this week. “When you can't put the ball in the basket, you really have a hard time staying with a team like Marquette.”

Ohio State 73, Arizona 70 — In Los Angeles, LaQuinton Ross hit the tiebreaking 3-pointer with 2 seconds to play, and Ohio State advanced to the brink of its second straight Final Four appearance.

Ross, the Buckeyes' remarkable reserve, scored 14 of his 17 points in the second half for the second-seeded Buckeyes (29-7), who rallied from an early 11-point deficit and weathered the sixth-seeded Wildcats' late charge for their 11th consecutive victory since mid-February.

Deshaun Thomas scored 20 points for Ohio State, and Aaron Craft added 13 before ceding the Buckeyes' final shot to Ross. Craft hit a similar 3-pointer against Iowa State last Sunday to send the Buckeyes forward.

Mark Lyons' acrobatic three-point play for the Wildcats (27-8) had tied it with 21.8 seconds left.

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