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College football notebook: ESPN, SEC agree on network

| Thursday, May 2, 2013, 7:06 p.m.

• The SEC and ESPN on Thursday announced a 20-year agreement to operate a SEC network that is scheduled to debut in August, 2014. SEC commissioner Mike Slive said the SEC network will produce 1,000 live events each year, including 450 televised on the network and 550 distributed digitally. Slive says the network will carry approximately 45 SEC football games each year “and a depth of content across all sports.” No financial terms were released for the deal, which continues through 2034. The SEC signed a 15-year deal with CBS in 2008. CBS will still have the first choice of SEC football games.

• “The House that Rockne Built” could be getting a new look. University officials announced a feasibility study to determine whether it makes sense to make better use of space at Notre Dame Stadium, which is used fewer than 10 times a year for football games, commencement and recreational events.

• The ACC's future bowl lineup is likely to include the New Era Pinstripe Bowl and a return to the Gator Bowl, ESPN reported. The ACC, which is restructuring its bowl lineup, will likely remain in the Champs Sports Bowl, the Music City Bowl and the Belk Bowl in the future, the report said.

• The attorney for LSU running back Jeremy Hill says a brief mobile phone video showing Hill punching another man does not show important events that precipitated the fight. Hill was booked early Saturday with misdemeanor simple battery, which could cost the leading LSU rusher his sophomore season — if not more.

• Strong winds in Lubbock have caused damage to a light tower at Texas Tech's football stadium and forced evacuations in some nearby buildings. No injuries were reported.

—Wire reports

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