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Penn State

Seven Penn State players heading to NFL as undrafted free agents

| Sunday, April 29, 2018, 10:06 p.m.
Penn State defensive tackle Parker Cothren pulls down running back Josh McPhearson during the Penn State Blue-White game Saturday, April 22, 2017. Cothren signed with the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Centre Daily Times
Penn State defensive tackle Parker Cothren pulls down running back Josh McPhearson during the Penn State Blue-White game Saturday, April 22, 2017. Cothren signed with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Seven players from Penn State have agreed to contracts with NFL teams as undrafted free agents, according to tweets from the Nittany Lions' football program and the individual players.

Linebacker Jason Cabinda and wide receiver Saeed Blacknall both agreed to terms with the Oakland Raiders. Defensive tackle Curtis Cothran, who played his high school ball at Council Rock North, was picked up by the Minnesota Vikings.

Other Nittany Lions who agreed to free-agent deals were defensive tackle Parker Cothren with the Pittsburgh Steelers, kicker Tyler Davis with the Buffalo Bills, cornerback Grant Haley with the New York Giants and offensive lineman Brendan Mahon with the Carolina Panthers.

In all, 13 Penn State players were either drafted or picked up by teams as free agents. Running back Saquon Barkley headed the list of draftees, being selected No. 2 overall by the Giants.

Other players drafted were tight end Mike Gesicki in the second round (No. 42 overall) by Miami, safety Troy Apke, a Mt. Lebanon grad, in the fourth round (No. 109) by Washington, wide receiver DaeSean Hamilton in the fourth round (No. 113) by Denver, safety Marcus Allen in the fifth round (No. 148) by Pittsburgh and cornerback Christian Campbell in the sixth round (No. 182) by Arizona.

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