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Penn State DT Hill holds up in return

| Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012, 10:06 p.m.

LINCOLN, Neb. — A physical game knocked out a handful of Penn State players Saturday at Memorial Stadium, but the news was not all bad for the Nittany Lions on the injury front.

Jordan Hill returned a week after spraining his left knee, and the senior defensive tackle held up against Nebraska's offensive line in Penn State's 32-23 loss.

“I felt like my first step was a little slow,” Hill said, “but once I got going it felt better.”

Hill said he knew Friday he would play against the Cornhuskers. He didn't anticipate playing as many snaps he did, but Penn State couldn't ease Hill back to action after defensive tackle James Terry left the game in the second half with what appeared to be a lower leg injury.

Terry had started in place of Hill.

“Once I get a little bit of rest, I'll be fine,” said Hill, who anticipates playing Saturday against visiting Indiana.

Hill's final road game at Penn State went down as a loss, but he said he didn't have a problem with the questionable call that resulted in a lost fumble by tight end Matt Lehman in the fourth quarter of a 27-23 game.

“I got a bunch of texts saying that he scored, but we shouldn't have been in that predicament anyway,” Hill said. “We let them come right out of halftime and start their momentum.”

Carter hurt again

Tight end Kyle Carter played despite a sprained ankle, but the redshirt freshman may have a more pressing concern.

Carter left in the third quarter with a wrist injury and did not return. He caught one pass for 12 yards.

Coach Bill O'Brien did not have an update after the game.

Running back Zach Zwinak left in the third quarter because of cramps, but the redshirt sophomore returned after getting IV treatment in the locker room.

Say what?

Penn State was penalized eight times for 80 yards, including a 15-yarder after the Nittany Lions were called for sideline interference following a 16-yard punt by Nebraska's Brett Maher.

Instead of starting its final possession of the second quarter on Nebraska's 41-yard line, Penn State opened at its 44.

“From what I was told, he ran into one of our players, and I guess that's sideline interference,” O'Brien said.

When asked if he has ever seen that call made in all his years of coaching, O'Brien said, “No.”

Scott Brown is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at sbrown@tribweb.com.

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