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Penn State's Carter out for rest of season

| Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012, 3:22 p.m.

• The hand injury that knocked tight end Kyle Carter out of Penn State's 32-23 loss at Nebraska last Saturday also has ended the redshirt freshman's season. Coach Bill O'Brien said Tuesday that Carter, who also missed a game with an ankle injury, will not play in Penn State's final two games. Carter caught 36 passes for 435 yards and two TDs while playing one of the most complex positions on the team. Carter's tight end spot requires players to line up in multiple positions, including as a wideout and in the backfield. “Offensively, it's the second-hardest position to learn behind quarterback,” O'Brien said. “There's so many things you have to know, and I thought as a young player he came in here and did an excellent job.”

• O'Brien did not make quarterback Matt McGloin available to the media this week for the first time this season, but the first-year coach said the decision had nothing to do with McGloin's post-game comments at Nebraska. McGloin said a controversial call that went against the Nittany Lions — and loomed large in the outcome — didn't surprise him. The fifth-year senior said Penn State will never get close calls because “it's us against the world.” Said O'Brien, “At the end of the day it's a free country and Matt can say what he wants, and he did.”

• O'Brien shrugged off a question about Penn State's third-quarter woes. The Nittany Lions have been outscored, 56-6, in the games they have lost. “We make adjustments,” O'Brien said. “Sometimes those adjustments work, sometimes they don't. I wouldn't make too much out of this second half thing. We just need to coach it and play it better.”

• Starting free safety Malcolm Willis (ankle) and running back Curtis Dukes (head) are listed as day-to-day for Penn State's game against visiting Indiana on Saturday.

—Scott Brown

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