Share This Page

Penn State football notebook: Mauti mum on petition plans for 6th year

| Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012, 6:22 p.m.

Senior outside linebacker Michael Mauti, who couldn't play in his final game because of a knee injury sustained a week earlier, declined to discuss the severity of the injury after Penn State's 24-21 overtime win against Wisconsin on Saturday.

The fifth-year senior also did not address whether he will petition the NCAA for a sixth season of eligibility after his third season-ending knee injury.

“It's not for me to say right now,” Mauti said. “I just really want to keep the focus on this team.”

Penn State honored Mauti by wearing No. 42 on its helmets. Outside linebacker Gerald Hodges switched from No. 6 to No. 42 for the game, and Mauti said he had trouble putting into words what those gestures and this season meant to him.

“It's just been such a special thing to be a part of,” he said. “It's really been the most fun I've ever had fun playing.”

• Jesse James (South Allegheny) broke out in the second half of the season, catching 13 passes for 274 yards and four TDs in Penn State's final six games. James, who caught two passes for 2 yards and a score in the Nittany Lions' first six games, credited seniors such as Mauti for helping him during the team's off week. “They really put it on me how hard you have to practice,” James said, “and I carried that throughout the rest of the season.”

• Defensive coordinator Ted Roof said the leadership shown by the seniors will have a lasting impact on the program. “What we have to do moving forward is develop that same type of leadership,” Roof said. “(The underclassmen have) seen how it's supposed to look. ... It's not just words. They've seen that in action.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.