Share This Page

PSU falls in NCAA women's soccer final

| Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012, 6:52 p.m.

SAN DIEGO — North Carolina scored three goals in the second half to beat Penn State, 4-1, and win its 21st women's soccer NCAA championship.

The Tar Heels (15-5-3), who were making their 26th appearance in the final four College Cup, won the title for the first time since 2009.

Penn State, playing in its first women's soccer championship game, finished the season 21-4-2.

With the game tied, 1-1, Hanna Gardner scored 48 seconds into the second half when she converted Katie Bowen's corner kick with a header past Penn State goalkeeper Erin McNulty. It was Gardner's second goal of the season.

Satara Murray, who had set up the Tar Heels' first goal early in the opening half, made the score 3-1 in the 64th minute when she put home a rebound of a shot by Kelly McFarlane. It was her first goal of the season.

A little more than 10 minutes later, Crystal Dunn set up Ranee Premji on a pass from the end line on the left wing, and Premji made a one-touch volley to increase the lead to 4-1.

North Carolina took a 1-0 lead in the second minute of play as Kealia Ohai rifled a shot from just outside the top of the box 18 yards into the upper right corner of the goal. Murray had set up the scoring play with high ball that led Ohai perfectly.

Penn State got even in the 26th minute when Christine Nairn slipped a pass through three North Carolina defenders to Taylor Schram (Canon-McMillan) on the left wing, and Schram shot over goalie Adelaide Gay into the far right corner.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.