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Pitt basketball loses another recruit

| Friday, April 21, 2017, 4:39 p.m.

Pitt coach Kevin Stallings lost his second recruit in a week Friday when the university released guard Aaron Thompson from his national letter of intent.

Thompson, 6-foot-2, 175 pounds, verbally committed to the Panthers shortly after Stallings was hired last year. He signed his letter of intent in November.

Pitt also lost verbal commit Troy Simons earlier this week when he decided to sign with New Mexico.

Thompson was a high school teammate of former Pitt forward Corey Manigault at Paul VI in Fairfax, Va. Manigault is one of four Pitt players who are transferring, including sophomore Cam Johnson, who would have been the team's leading returning scorer.

Overall, Pitt lost four senior starters who exhausted their eligibility and five others from last year's team, including point guard Justice Kithcart, who was dismissed by Stallings.

Pitt finished 16-17, 4-14 in the ACC last season, its first losing record since 2000.

Pitt has five players in its 2017 recruiting class: junior college player Jared Wilson-Frame; Marcus Carr, a Rivals top 100 point guard; wing player Shamiel Stevenson; and big men Terrell Brown and Peace Ilegomah.

“We are excited about the five players we currently have signed and will continue to recruit players committed to forming the foundation of this program,” Stallings said in a statement. “We have added five talented players that will help build a sustainable winning culture through selflessness, accountability and execution.”

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