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Former Pitt, Clairton star Tyler Boyd of Cincinnati Bengals facing drug charges, denies involvement in crash

| Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017, 5:54 p.m.
The Bengals' Tyler Boyd picks up first-quarter yards against the Steelers on Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016, at Heinz Field.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
The Bengals' Tyler Boyd picks up first-quarter yards against the Steelers on Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016, at Heinz Field.
The Bengals' Tyler Boyd catches a fourth-quarter pass as Steelers defenders Sean Davis (top) and Mike Mitchell apply coverage Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016, at Heinz Field.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
The Bengals' Tyler Boyd catches a fourth-quarter pass as Steelers defenders Sean Davis (top) and Mike Mitchell apply coverage Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016, at Heinz Field.

Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver Tyler Boyd is facing drug charges after a crash in Jefferson Hills in July, according to a court papers filed Wednesday.

According to the criminal complaint, the former Clairton and Pitt standout's Mercedes-Benz was involved in a crash around 3 a.m. July 12 on State Route 837, near Valley Hotel in Jefferson Hills.

Police said the vehicle was driving too fast and crossed the center line before hitting a guardrail on the opposite side of the road.

When police arrived, there was no one in the car.

Police discovered the car was registered to Boyd. Inside, they found an open bottle of cognac and unopened bottle of peach vodka. They also found vape pens and unopened vape cartridges with ingredients that included distilled cannabis.

On July 14, Boyd told police another man was driving the car and that he was in Shadyside at the time of the crash.

On Thursday, Boyd, 22, posted on Twitter: “Everybody chill out i wasn't present at the crash nor did i have anything to do with it period. It was just my car.”

Boyd was charged with possession of a controlled substance — THC — and not being registered to possess a controlled substance.

The Bengals released a statement: “We are aware of the media report and are working to gather more information.”

Boyd is scheduled for a preliminary hearing Nov. 15 before District Judge John Bova.

A second-round pick in the 2016 NFL Draft, Boyd caught 54 passes for 603 yards and a touchdown last season. He has four catches for 37 yards this season.

He was a healthy scratch in a Week 2 loss to Houston.

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