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Pitt QB Savage will rest with concussion symptoms

| Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013, 9:12 p.m.

Pitt coach Paul Chryst said Wednesday that plays similar to the hit to the head of quarterback Tom Savage on Saturday are difficult for defenders to avoid.

Savage slid at the end of a 14-yard scramble on the last play of the third quarter and was hit by Virginia linebacker Daquan Romero.

“Those are hard plays for defenders when the level of the ball-carrier changes, as well,” Chryst said. “Every weekend, you see a lot of that.”A new NCAA rule mandates that hits to the head are cause for ejection, but no penalty was called and Romero remained in the game.

“Certainly I think there's a great emphasis, and the right emphasis, at looking to make sure we keep the integrity of the game,” Chryst said, “also with a high importance ... of taking care of those playing.”

Chryst said he spoke to the ACC office about the play and received a response, but he refused to discuss it with reporters.

Later in the game, Savage experienced concussion symptoms after he was thrown to the ground, Chryst said. By the time Savage was pulled from the game, he had been sacked seven times.

“He says he's fine, passing the protocol that we go through (when a concussion is suspected),” Chryst said.

Chryst said Savage will be among Pitt regulars who will rest this week while the team conducts two practices. The Panthers don't play until Oct. 12 at Virginia Tech.

“There are a certain number of guys, and Tommy is one of them, we're going to use (the off week) to kind of rest their bodies,” he said. “We need to make sure we get our other quarterbacks some work. Tommy gets so much work during the week. But thankfully, he's doing well.”

Jerry DiPaola is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at jdipaola@tribweb.com or via Twitter @JDiPaola_Trib.

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