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Pitt men's hoops honored by NCAA for academic rates

| Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 7:42 p.m.

For the third time in four years, Pitt received recognition from the NCAA for ranking among the top 10 percent of all 351 men's basketball programs for its academic progress rate.

APR takes into account graduation rates over a four-year period between 2009-10 and 2012-13 and is considered a real-time measure of retention and eligibility. Pitt received recognition in 2009-10 and 2010-11 under coach Jamie Dixon and academic support services director Mike Farabaugh, joining Duke and Notre Dame as the only ACC schools to earn honors three of the past four years.

The ACC had 77 teams in all sports recognized, the most of the five major conferences.

“Jamie Dixon continues to prove that you can have one of the top basketball program in the country and still achieve the highest levels of academic success,” Pitt athletic director Steve Pederson said in a prepared statement. “We are fortunate to have a gentleman leading our basketball program who personifies the ideals of this great university.”

Pitt had four players — junior Cameron Wright and freshmen Jamel Artis, Josh Newkirk and Mike Young — named to the Academic All-ACC team.

Wright also received the Skip Prosser Award, honoring the ACC's top scholar-athlete in basketball.

Dixon said graduating his players “will always be the No. 1 priority for our program” and called the recognition from the NCAA “a tremendous honor for our university and a great reward for all the hard work and dedication that our players have put into their studies.”

Kevin Gorman is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at kgorman@tribweb.com or via Twitter @KGorman_Trib.

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