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WVU

WVU notebook: Simulating K-State QB proves difficult

| Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, 6:08 p.m.

• It's not easy to duplicate Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein. Just ask West Virginia coach Dana Holgorsen. The second-year coach originally wanted 6-foot-6 freshman receiver Will Johnson to emulate Klein, who's rushed for 10 touchdowns this season, on the scout team. With Johnson hampered by a back injury, there will be a Klein-by-committee approach. “It won't look like it, and that's a problem,” Holgorsen said. “If you can find a 6-foot-5 guy that is big, strong and fast, he is probably not going to be on scout team.”

• Kansas State runs a slightly nontraditional offense, at least in the Big 12. The Wildcats operate a spread-option offense, but the unit moves a bit slower and will huddle. They are averaging 40 points per game on only 63 snaps per game. Kansas State's rushing attack averages 248.5 yards per game, led by running back John Hubert (101.0 ypg) and Klein (85.0 ypg).

• Last Saturday's demoralizing loss to Texas Tech was West Virginia's first since Nov. 5, 2011, a span of just over 11 months. “It is embarrassing,” Holgorsen said. “The guys were hurt and disappointed. We got in here (on Sunday), and I didn't sugarcoat anything.”

• After seeing his first action of the season at Texas Tech, true freshman Travares Copeland is slated to start Saturday against Kansas State. Copeland caught one pass for 5 yards in the second half after replacing the injured Stedman Bailey.

• Holgorsen ruled cornerback Broderick Jenkins out for this week's game. He suffered a slight cartilage tear but isn't out for the year. All other injured players — most notably, Bailey (ankle), offensive lineman Jeff Braun (ankle), defensive lineman Will Clarke (undisclosed) and running back Shawne Alston (thigh) — are day-to-day.

— Josh Sickles

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