Share This Page
WVU

Harris scores 33 in WVU win over Duquesne

| Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
West Virginia's Eron Harris (10) drives past Duquesne's Micah Mason (22) during the first half Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
Duquesne's Ovie Soko (0) lays in a basket during the first half against West Virginia on Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Devin Williams (5) brings down a rebound against a Duquesne defender during the first half Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
Duquesne's Ovie Soko (left) goes to block West Virginia's Juwan Staten (3) during the first half Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Eron Harris (10) drives past Duquesne's Jerry Jones (5) during the second half Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Devin Williams (5) shoots over Duquesne's Dominique McKoy (left) during the second half Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.
West Virginia's Juwan Staten (3) shoots over Duquesne's Desmond Ridenour (left) during the second half Sunday, Nov. 17, 2013, in Morgantown, W.Va.

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. — Which Mountaineer was most responsible for Sunday afternoon's outcome?

Duquesne had at least a couple clear-cut choices.

West Virginia sophomore Eron Harris was outstanding from the 3-point line, but Juwan Staten's quickness also troubled Duquesne in the Dukes' 96-83 nonconference loss at WVU Coliseum.

Harris, who made 6 of 8 3-point shots, had 33 points. Staten, who made 14 of 19 free throws, scored 28.

“I know Harris scored all of those points, but we just couldn't keep (Staten) in front of us,” Duquesne coach Jim Ferry said of the 6-foot-1 junior guard who made 7 of 11 shots, had nine assists, three steals and just one turnover. “We tried zone, we tried trapping him, we tried stepping off and playing in the paint to make him make other decisions.

“I thought he just dominated.”

It was WVU's ninth win in the past 10 games against Duquesne (1-2), which won 60-56 last season at Consol Energy Center. WVU (2-1) is 67-3 against nonconference visitors the past 11 seasons.

Yet, Sunday's outcome wasn't certain until well into the second half.

With 14:54 left, a 3-pointer by Duquesne's Micah Mason forced a 59-59 tie. And with 7:30 left, the WVU lead was only four points.

WVU distanced itself from the Dukes in the final six minutes, a game-winning push sparked by consecutive 3-pointers from Harris and Terry Henderson just 19 seconds apart. A 14-1 run gave West Virginia a 89-72 lead with 2:51 left.

“We went from being up by four to being up by 10,” WVU coach Bob Huggins said. “When you look at the scoreboard, you feel a lot more comfortable.”

This was the second time 3-point shooters proved difficult for Duquesne. WVU made 10 of 18. New Hampshire made 15 of 27.

“We gave them a couple really good looks early in the second half,” Duquesne senior Ovie Soko said, “and they got it going.”

Soko had 19 points and 12 rebounds for Duquesne, which held a 39-30 rebounding edge. Mason had 18 points.

“We knew it came down to getting stops on the other end of the court,” Mason said. “Staten and Harris just weren't missing much.”

Chris Harlan is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach him at charlan@tribweb.com or via Twitter @CHarlan_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.