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Prospect watch: Mt. Lebanon's Tyler Roth a jack of all trades

| Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012, 11:12 p.m.
Mt. Lebanon QB Tyler Roth looks downfield for a open receiver during his team's game against North Allegheny on Saturday August 31, 2012. Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review

TYLER ROTH

6-foot-2, 180 pounds, QB-DB-P, Mt. Lebanon

Tyler Roth is comfortable with the football in his hands. It's just a matter of college coaches determining whether he is at his best throwing it, catching it or punting it.

Roth is a first-year starter at quarterback for the Blue Devils, an all-conference cornerback and one of the top punters in the WPIAL. He has a nice combination of size and speed, with a 4.6-second speed in the 40-yard dash and a 31-inch vertical leap, and had three interceptions as a junior.

“Most see me as a defensive back that also punts,” Roth said. “That's what a lot of coaches say. If they're teeter-tottering over whether they want me, that puts it over the edge.”

His versatility — as well as a 4.5 weighted grade-point average and score of 30 on the ACT — is drawing the interest of Ivy and Patriot league schools. Bucknell has offered a scholarship, and Cornell, Dartmouth and Princeton also are recruiting Roth.

“I really want to go to a good school,” said Roth, who plans to study engineering, “so I'm looking as much at academics as athletics.”

Roth also is a two-year starter at shooting guard for Mt. Lebanon's basketball team, which reached the PIAA Class AAAA final his sophomore season. Blue Devils football coach Mike Melnyk is excited to see how Roth works with Troy Apke, a speedy junior wide receiver who already has a scholarship offer from Pitt.

“He's very talented, just a good athlete,” Melnyk said of Roth. “He's been in a lot of heated situations between basketball and football. I think he's poised to have a breakout year. They go hand in hand.”

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