Share This Page

Recruiting: Meyer's persona no Urban legend

| Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012, 12:01 a.m.
Ohio State coach Urban Meyer has a talent for recruiting, and he has had success attracting WPIAL players. AP Photo/Al Goldis, File

Ohio State is attractive to Western Pennsylvania prospects for a multitude of reasons, from its status as a perennial power in close proximity to Pittsburgh to its fervent following to the number of NFL players its produces.

Nothing about the Buckeyes resonates with WPIAL players as prominently as these two words: Urban Meyer.

When it comes to recruiting prestige and prowess among the region's major college coaches, the Ohio State coach is unmatched.

“Urban's one of the best recruiters in the country as a head coach,” Scout.com recruiting analyst Bob Lichtenfels said.

“He's got that rock-star persona. He's got a swagger about him that a lot of coaches don't have, and he's not afraid to go to any state or any school and compete against anybody.”

Meyer immediately made inroads last December with five-star Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt defensive end Noah Spence, scoring the state's best player for the Buckeyes' top-five recruiting class.

Now, Meyer is in the mix with the three best remaining uncommitted prospects in the WPIAL Class of 2013.

Ohio State offered a scholarship Friday to Clairton's Tyler Boyd, and the Buckeyes are believed to be held in high regard by the four-star receiver.

Central Valley receiver Robert Foster has Ohio State among his finalists, along with Alabama and Pitt, and cited Meyer as a major reason it made the cut.

Belle Vernon offensive tackle Dorian Johnson also has Ohio State high on his list, along with Pitt and Virginia Tech, after backing out of his Penn State pledge.

This isn't to suggest that Meyer always gets his man, but rather that Pitt has competition for Foster and Johnson and that West Virginia might no longer be in the lead for Boyd.

It's also possible that Ohio State has turned its focus from Foster to Boyd, or is investing in a backup plan.

WPIAL stars have had varied success at Ohio State, but none played for Meyer so he gets a clean slate.

“Nowadays, just because it's Pennsylvania, not every kid is going to go to Penn State or Pittsburgh,” Lichtenfels said. “With Ohio kids, nine of 10 go to Ohio State if given the opportunity. Ohio State has been a top-five program for however many years, and Pitt and Penn State haven't. They're the sexy team now.”

With the coach who has rock-star persona and a reputation for recruiting.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.