Share This Page

Fox Chapel Hall of Fame will induct football coach Marelli

| Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Submitted
Jim Marelli will be inducted into the Fox Chapel Sports Hall of Fame.

This is the fourth in a series highlighting the 2013 inductees into the Fox Chapel Sports Hall of Fame.

Jim Marelli coached football at Fox Chapel Area High School for 18 years and was the head coach from 1979 through 1988.

His teams achieved much success during his tenure as they won two conference championships, advanced to the WPIAL AAAA semifinals twice and the quarterfinals once.

During a five-year stretch in the 1980s, the Foxes won 70 percent of their games.

“The kids were always the focus, not the wins and losses,” Marelli said. “I had the pleasure of having some great assistant coaches and we worked with some fine young men. We had some pretty good players during my coaching career there. Kids like Chris Thorpe, Frank Rocco and Danny Rocco helped us have some pretty good teams.”

Marelli, who grew up in Creighton and attended East Deer High School, moved on to the collegiate ranks after leaving Fox Chapel and he coached at Carnegie Mellon University.

“I was still teaching at Fox Chapel and coaching at CMU. It was a great experience,” Marelli said. “I worked with some outstanding young men and coached with some great guys like Richie Lackner and Rich Erdelyi.

“The biggest difference in coaching at the high school level and college was probably the discipline and the attention span.

“I also got to coach my son, Bryn, at CMU.”

Marelli had a tough time recalling his most memorable moments at Fox Chapel.

“There were so many great experiences,” he said. “One game that stands out is a game against McKeesport. They were always one of the top teams in the WPIAL. We were on the cusp of turning things around but they were bigger and faster than us.

“We were a gritty team, though. We led by seven and McKeesport scored with 30 seconds left. They went for the two-point conversion and we stopped them.

“I was never prouder of my guys. Our team turned the corner after that game.”

Marelli said he loved his coaching days at Fox Chapel and it was gratifying getting to see the players mature as they went through the program.

“It was a good feeling whenever they would come back and take the time to stop in and say hello,” he said.

Besides his son, Marelli and his wife, Diana — who he said is “a saint for putting up with me” — have a daughter, Jamie, who lives in Plum.

The Marellis live in Summerville, SC.

Marty Stewart is a sports editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-782-2123 or mstewart@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.