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Three Chartiers Valley players participating in US Soccer Regional

| Wednesday, June 26, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
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Calvin Boyle, Jesse Tinney and Kyle Fisher will participate in the US Youth Soccer Region I championships this weekend.

When the Century V United 9 596 boys soccer team takes the field at University of Rhode Island for the US Soccer Region I Championships this weekend, it will have a bit of local flavor.

Three rising seniors from Chartiers Valley — Calvin Boyle, Kyle Fisher and Jesse Tinney — are part of the 18-man roster that claimed the 2013 Pennsylvania West Soccer State Cup.

“Winning the cup is one of the biggest accomplishments of my soccer career,” Tinney said. “It is very prestigious.”

The Century squad won an eight-team tournament in May to claim the cup and punch its ticket to Rhode Island.

The team defeated the North United Strikers, 4-0, and the Beadling 95ers, 3-0, to reach the title game. Century then defeated the Washington Victory Express, 2-1, to reach regionals.

“There are not as many U17 teams in Pittsburgh as somewhere like New York or Maryland,” Fisher said. “We did get a win over Beadling, who were the state champions last year.”

The US Youth Soccer State Cup champions and select runners-up from 15 areas will participate this weekend in the Region I championships in Kingston, R.I. The areas competing in Region I are Connecticut, Delaware, Eastern New York, Eastern Pennsylvania, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York West, Pennsylvania West, Vermont, Virginia and West Virginia.

“It is going to be a whole new level,” Boyle said. “The facilities and teams we are going to see will be a lot better than we have seen. Our team goal is to advance. We will need to play well to do that.

“One of the biggest things for us is to not just be happy getting there.”

Tinney will be the lone Chartiers Valley player making the trip with Regional experience and knows the level of competition the club will see. He had played with the Beadling club before this season and has made the trek to regionals twice before.

“It is very competitive,” Tinney said. “Every game is a challenge. I know this is the first time this team has been there, so it is lacking the experience but I don't think it will matter too much.”

Century United will face Vermont's Nordic Soccer Club on Friday, Maine's MCU Portland Phoenix on Friday and Penn Fusion SA from eastern Pennsylvania on Sunday in pool play.

The teams with the best record move on to the semifinals Monday.

The trio hopes the experience in Rhode Island will pave the way for a strong senior year.

They all agreed that the high level of competition they will see likely will benefit them when they take to the field with Chartiers Valley in August.

“We have been playing together since we were five, and we are best friends,” Tinney said. “Playing on our varsity team and on a club team together really helps us build some chemistry.”

Chartiers Valley has not been to the WPIAL playoffs since 2009, and this season will be the last chance for the trio to get a taste of the postseason,

“Playoffs are a viable goal,” Boyle said. “The biggest hurdle is going to be making it, because we are in one of the toughest sections in the area.

“If we can advance past that, it will give us a chance to win a WPIAL title. We won't see any stronger competition than we will in our own section.”

Nathan Smith is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at nsmith@tribweb.com or 412-388-5813.

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