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Sports website flourishing for Hempfield freshman

| Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, 8:55 p.m.

Creating an upstart sports website is one thing, but maintaining and enhancing it is another, especially for a high school freshman.

But that's exactly what Hempfield freshman Noah Miller and a pair of colleagues have done with their website, The Sports Crave (thesportscrave.com).

Creating their sports commentary website (sportswith3.com) in March 2012, Miller, 13-year old Jinx Grand and William Scott reached more than 2,100 Twitter followers and interacted with sports figures such as Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban through email.

But it wasn't until August that they decided to make the change to The Sports Crave.

“The real reason was, for our future we may not always be ‘three,' so we changed to The Sports Crave because it will give us a more broad name and not limit us,” Miller said.

The change has helped, along with the third major member of their team — Dylan Gerr of Chicago who stepped in for Scott — to grow in popularity (more than 3,600 Twitter followers) through their website, along with their PSC Radio Network that has had guest appearances from ESPN anchors.

While deciding on a new name for their website wasn't easy, the teens were able to brainstorm a catchy domain name.

“The Sports Crave just came to mind … like craving sports, this is what you like,” Miller said. “This is what you get updates on your phone for because you love sports.”

The Sports Crave covers all four of the major professional sports, as well as providing in-depth NCAA coverage with a group of up to 10 primary contributors that made USA Today take notice and form a partnership.

“They will basically view our website and if they find any interesting articles they would like to feature on the USA Today sports page, they basically have the properties and the rights to use whatever articles we publish,” said Grand, based out of Woodbridge, N.J.

While Miller and Grand have lofty aspirations, their goal for right now is to stay in touch with their fans.

“(Our goal is) to be the most interactive sports site there is,” Miller said. “On Twitter, we want to interact with fans. We're not going to be a stuck-up sports site where we don't respond to fans because we have the ego that we are big. I want to be big, but I just don't want that to take away from communicating with fans and building relationships.”

Alex Oltmanns is a freelance writer.

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