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Bisignani steps down as boys basketball coach at Greensburg CC

Bill Beckner Jr.
| Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 9:31 p.m.
Greensburg Central Catholic head coach Greg Bisignani talks with his team prior to the start of the fourth quarter as they lead Coudersport 58-50 in the second round of the PIAA Class 2A playoffs on Thursday, March 16, 2017, at Clearfield Area High School. Greensburg Central Catholic won 72-63, eliminating Coudersport from the playoffs with their first loss of the season.
Ken Reabe Jr. | For The Tribune-Review
Greensburg Central Catholic head coach Greg Bisignani talks with his team prior to the start of the fourth quarter as they lead Coudersport 58-50 in the second round of the PIAA Class 2A playoffs on Thursday, March 16, 2017, at Clearfield Area High School. Greensburg Central Catholic won 72-63, eliminating Coudersport from the playoffs with their first loss of the season.
Greensburg Central Catholic head coach Greg Bisignani talks with his team during a fourth quarter timeout in a WPIAL Class 2A playoff game with Neshannock on Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, at Fox Chapel High School. Greensburg Central Catholic won 57-37.
Ken Reabe Jr. | For The Tribune-Review
Greensburg Central Catholic head coach Greg Bisignani talks with his team during a fourth quarter timeout in a WPIAL Class 2A playoff game with Neshannock on Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, at Fox Chapel High School. Greensburg Central Catholic won 57-37.

The doctor is ... out.

Greg Bisignani resigned as boys basketball coach at Greensburg Central Catholic after eight seasons.

An orthopedic surgeon, Bisignani said “multiple factors,” including time constraints, wanting to spend more time with family and general coaching stress led to his departure.

“A lot of things drew me down,” Bisignani said. “It was totally my decision. I feel like I have lost my passion and desire to continue to run the program, and that is not fair to the kids. The decision was not easy, trust me. There were tears. Ninety percent of coaching is great and 10 percent is terrible. It's the 10 percent that drives you out.”

GCC is coming off its best regular season in program history: a 22-0 mark (25-2 overall) with trips to the WPIAL Class 2A semifinals and PIAA quarterfinals.

Many wonder how Bisignani did it: workdays full of office visits and surgeries — even on game nights.

“There were plenty of nights when I only got five or six hours of sleep during the season,” he said.

Bisignani, 50, recently sold his personal practice to Excela and now works for that company, which could impact his normal basketball hours. That is another reason that could have a residual effect on coaching demands.

“I'm not self-employed anymore,” he said. “It will be tough to make those 2:30 (p.m.) practices every day.”

No coach in the WPIAL had a better winning percentage than Bisignani in the past eight years. He went 187-32 with eight section titles — a 92-4 mark in section play — two WPIAL finals trips and a PIAA runner-up finish. Exactly half of his losses came in the playoffs.

“I have seen a lot of changes in the last eight years,” Bisignani said. “Kids aren't getting out on their own and working on their games. And there is a sense of entitlement. It's been a good run. But the cupboard isn't bare.”

GCC lost its top returning scorer in would-be junior guard Asa Klimchock, who is transferring to The Kiski School and reclassifying to play three more years.

Bisignani's staff also is leaving.

Behind-the-scenes decisions, like setting up fundraisers and picking out which high-tops the team will wear, is for someone else to do, he said.

“I will still be around. I will still support GCC basketball in any way possible,” Bisignani said. “I will keep the scorebook, be an assistant, whatever. I just don't want to run the program any longer.”

Bisignani's son, Ryan, will be a junior basketball player at GCC.

With coaching out of the picture, Bisignani can spend more time with his wife, Audrey, and see his other three children more.

Collin, 21, is an rising senior at West Virginia.

Leah, 20, will be a redshirt sophomore at Seton Hill, where she plays volleyball, and Mikayla just graduated from GCC and will swim at Johns Hopkins, where she will study medicine.

Greg Bisignani said a few of his former players also want to get into the medical field.

“I have coached some great kids,” he said. “There are some kids who want to be orthopedic surgeons. That is flattering. I like to think I helped make a difference. That means a lot.”

Only two WPIAL boys basketball programs have won a PIAA playoff game in each of the last eight years: GCC and Beaver Falls.

Bill Beckner Jr. is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at bbeckner@tribweb.com or via Twitter @BillBeckner.

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