Share This Page

Beaver Falls star Jeter picks Vanderbilt

| Thursday, May 3, 2012, 8:06 p.m.
Christopher Horner
Beaver Falls' Sheldon Jeter steals the ball from Quaker Valley's R.J. West to put the Tigers ahead for good during the fourth quarter of their PIAA Class AA semifinal Wednesday March 21, 2012 at Ambridge High School. Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Christopher Horner
Beaver Falls' Sheldon Jeter takes a shot against New Brighton Tuesday January 3, 2012 at Beaver Falls. (Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review)

When Sheldon Jeter took his official visit to Vanderbilt last week, coaches presented a cake to the Beaver Falls basketball star that read, “Winning the SEC will be sweeter with my main man.”

Getting his signature will be the icing on the cake for the Commodores.

Jeter made a verbal commitment to Vanderbilt on Thursday, choosing the Commodores over Penn State and Wisconsin. The standout from the Class of 2012 also had scholarship offers from Florida State, Kansas State, Seton Hall and South Carolina.

“I looked at the pros and cons, and it all added up to (Vanderbilt),” Jeter said. “I thought it'd be the perfect fit as far as playing style. It's up-tempo. They want to run. I like that.”

Jeter, a 6-foot-7, 215-pound swingman, averaged 21.8 points and 12 rebounds as a senior to lead the Tigers to the WPIAL Class AA title and PIAA final, where they lost to Imhotep Charter. A first-team all-state selection and two-time Tribune-Review Terrific 10 pick, he finished with 1,489 career points.

Jeter became interested in the SEC when he was recruited by South Carolina, and Beaver Falls coach Doug Biega said Jeter was close to committing before coach Darrin Horn was fired. Vanderbilt was involved with Jeter early, but he needed to improve his grades to gain admission.

He made honor roll every semester as a senior, and the Commodores resumed recruiting Jeter when shooting guard John Jenkins declared for the NBA Draft.

The Commodores beat national champion Kentucky in the SEC Tournament final and won once in the NCAA Tournament.

Biega believes Jeter's best basketball is ahead of him.

“I'm happy for him,” Biega said. “He took his time, took in every variable he could possibly consider and made a mature decision. I tell people all the time, ‘This Sheldon Jeter we're looking at now is the worst version we'll see.' Let's just say that if basketball doesn't work out, he'll have a degree from there. You can't go wrong.”

Kevin Gorman is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at kgorman@tribweb.com or 412-320-7812.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.