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High school boys basketball roundup: Fourth-quarter surge leads Gateway past Kiski Area

| Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, 10:21 p.m.
Aliquippa's Dajon Perry (32) and Shawn Price (1) battle for a rebound against Jeannette's Seth Miller during the WPIAL Class AA boys basketball playoff game at Baldwin High School on Wednesday February 20, 2013. Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review

No. 9 seed Gateway (16-5) got 23 points and eight steals from senior guard Dennis Boyce to lead the Gators to a 56-45 win over No. 8 Kiski Area (16-6) in a Class AAAA first-round boys basketball game Wednesday night at Plum.

The two-time defending champion Gators advance to face top-seeded New Castle (23-0) in the quarterfinals Saturday at a site and time to be determined.

Kiski Area led by 13 in the second quarter, but Gateway cut it to 35-32 after three quarters before a decisive fourth-quarter surge.

The Gators started the fourth with a 9-0 run to take its first lead, 37-35, and stretched the advantage to 43-35 with 4:20 to play.

Back-to-back layups off steals by Boyce and Delvon Randall made it 52-41 with 1:02 left.

New Castle 85, Latrobe 64 — Shawn Anderson had 22 points, and Malik Hooker added 21 as top-seeded New Castle (23-0) rolled to a first-round win at North Allegheny. The Red Hurricanes will play Gateway in the quarterfinals. Latrobe ended 12-11.

North Allegheny 65, Canon-McMillan 38 — At Chartiers Valley, the No. 2 Tigers opened a 22-11 first-quarter lead and rolled to a first-round victory. James Meeker and Adam Haus each had 14 points, and Joe Mancini had 12 for North Allegheny (20-3), which will play Fox Chapel in the quarterfinals Saturday.

Class AA

Apollo-Ridge 56, Sto-Rox 52 — A balanced scoring attack of Lucas Burrell (18 points), Connor Billingsley (15) and Tre Tipton (14) allowed Apollo-Ridge (17-7) to upset No. 5 Sto-Rox (14-9) and advance to the quarterfinals for the first time since 1991. Lenny Williams finished with five 3-pointers and 21 points for Sto-Rox.Beaver Falls 78, Bishop Canevin 37 — Elijah Cotrill had 19 points to lead No. 1 Beaver Falls (20-3) to a first-round win. Nico DiPaolo had 11 for Bishop Canevin (10-13).

Brentwood 44, Shady Side Academy 39 — Led by Jason Pilarski's 22 points, Brentwood (14-9) scored a first-round victory at Woodland Hills. Michael Ware had 18 points for Shady Side Academy (9-15).

Burrell 61, Washington 50 — An 18-0, fourth-quarter run propelled Burrell (17-6) to a first-round victory at Hempfield. Pete Spagnolo led the Bucs with 18 points, and Matt Hess added 15. Josh Wise had 19, and Jordan Drew scored 12 to lead Washington (17-7).

Greensburg Central Catholic 52, Northgate 38 — Zach Herman scored 17 points, and Greensburg Central Catholic used a 10-2 fourth-quarter advantage to earn a first-round victory at Canon-McMillan. The No. 2 Centurions (25-1) will play Burrell in the quarterfinals Saturday.

Jeannette 71, Aliquippa 44 — Julian Batts scored 20 points and Jordan Edmunds added 18 to lead Jeannette (18-4) to a first-round win at Baldwin.

Jeannette, which will play Apollo-Ridge in the quarterfinals Saturday, never trailed and dominated the boards. Seth Miller had 14 points and 11 rebounds, and Miles Sunder had 10 points and 11 rebounds.

Quaker Valley 53, Riverside 48 — Qadir Taylor hit a layup and foul shot with 23 seconds to go to give No. 6 Quaker Valley (19-4) the lead en route to a first-round win at Moon. Burke Moser had 18 points for the Quakers, who will play Seton-La Salle in the quarterfinals.

Seton-La Salle 62, Mohawk 39 — Seton-La Salle used a 24-6 run in the third quarter to lock up a first-round victory at Peters Township. Levi Masua scored 16 points, and Dale Clancy added 14 to lead the third-seeded Rebels (21-2).

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